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Full text of "Yearbook. Announcement. U.S. Grant University, Athens and Chattanooga, Tenn."

YEAR BOOK. 



i 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



U. S. Grant University 



Athens and Chattanoooa. Tenn,, 



1S93=94:. 



9 2400 ' 



YEAR BOOK, 



♦•!•♦♦- 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



U. S. Grant University, 

Athens and Chattanooga. Tenn., 



1893 = 94:, 



And Affiliated Academies and ©eminanes. 



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3 7^^, 7^ 3^ 

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printed by the 

Methodist Advocate-Journal, 

Chattanooga, Tunn. 



N1ERNER-PFEIFFER LIBRARY 

TENNESSEE WESLEYAN COLLEGE 

ATHENS, TN 37303 




OCT Z 'B* 




BENNETT HALL. ATHENS, TENN. 



CORPORATION. 



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OFFICERS OF BOAKD. 

CHAMBERLAIN President. 

CALDWELL .. First Vice PRESiDiNT. 

ADAMS, Second Vice President. 

Case Secretary. 

. HOOPER Treasurkr. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

I W. JOY' E, L B. CALDWELL, 

J. S. PETTY, P. J. FISHER, 

W. W. HOOPER, E. li. MATTHEWS, 

H. S. CHAMBERLAIN, .J. F LOOMIS, 

M. D. CONE, J W. ADAMS. 



TRUSTEES, 
i ERM EXPIRES IN 1896- 

J. W. ADAMS, Esq Chattanooga, Temi. 

H. S. CHAMBERLAIN, Esq Chattauooga, Tenn. 

Rev. earl CRANSTON, D, D Cincinnati, Ohio. 

M. D CONE, Esq Athens, Tenn. 

Rev. W L HYPES, D. D Cincinnati, O.iio. 

H. C. BEOK, Esq Chattanooga, Ttun. 

Bishop J. M. WALDEN, D. D Cinciauati. Ohio. 

TERM EXPIRES IN 1895. 

Rev. L. B. CALDWELL. D. D Athens, Tenn. 

Rkv. J. C HARTZELL, D. D. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Rev. W. W. HOOPER, D. D Chattanooga, Tenn. 

J. F. LOOMIS, Esq Chattanooga, Tern. 

Rev. D. H. MOORE, D. D Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Rev .] S. PETTY Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Rev. R. S. RUST, D. D Cincinnati, Ohio. 

TERM EXPIRES IN 1894. 

Rhv. T. C. CARTER, D. D Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Hon. H. B. case Chactanooga, Tenn. 

KishopI W JOVCE, D D. Ciiattanooga, Tenn. 

R.J. FISHER, Esq Athens, Tenn. 

E. H. MA TTH EWS, Esq Athens, Tenn. 

Hon. WILLIAM RULE KnoxviUe, Tenn. 

Rev. J. D. WALSH, D. D Louisville, Ky. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

ATHENS, TENNESSEE. 



FACULTY. 



BISHOP I. W. JOYCE, D. D., LL. D., 

Chancellor of the University. 

REV. R. J. COOKE, A. M., D. D., 

Vice-Chancellor. 

W. A. WRIGHT, A. M., 

Dean, and Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

D. A. BOLTON, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

W. J. BROWN, A. M., 

Professor ofNatural Science. 

E. C. FERGUSON, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

W. W. HOOPER, A. M., D. D., 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

MRS. A. C. KNIGHT, A. M., 

Professor of English Literature and Modern Languages. 

JNO. A HICKS, A. M., 

Adjunct Professor of Ancient Languages. 

MRS. MARY E. BROWN, 

Principal of Primary Department. 

MISS THEDA COBLEIGH, A. B., 

Assistant in English. 



U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

MRS. MARION YATES, 

Instructor in English. 

*W. W. SATTERLEE, D. D., 

Professor of Political Science and Hygienic Philosphy. 

FRANKLIN A. PEAKE, A. M., 

Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 

MRS. FLORA R. FERGUSON, 

Instructor in Art. 

MISS OPHIE M. BOLTON, 

Instructor in Instrumental Music. 

E. C. HORN, 

Instructor in Business Department. 

W. J. SCATES, 

Instructor in Penmanship. 
* Deceased. 



September 


4, 


1893, 


September 


5. 


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November 


29, 


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November 


30, 


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December 


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December 


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January 


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February 


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March 


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March 


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April 


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May 


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May 



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May 23, 

September 17,!,^ 
September 17, 
October 17, 



CALENDAR. 

Monday. .. .Entraace examinatiotis. 

Tuesday First term begins. 

Wednesday. First term ends. 
Thursday. .Thanksgiving Day. 
Monday... Second term begins. 

TueTdl7}^°^^^^y '■^^^''- 

Thursday. . .Washington's Birthday. 

Friday Second term ends. 

Monday Third term begins. 

Friday Grant's Birthday. 

Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon, 

at Athens. 
Tuesday. .Annual meeting Board Trustees 

at Athens. 
Wednesday. ..Commencement at Athens. 

Tuesday College of Medicine opens. 

Tuesday... . . .College of Pharmacy opens. 

Wednesday. ..College of Law opens. 



U.S. Grant University. 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 



LOCATION. 

The location of U. S. Grant University, at 
Athens and Chattanooga, Tennessee, is eminently 
favorable for a great and a permanent work. It is 
in a portion of the central South noted for pure air, 
excellent water, mild climate, and beautiful scener3\ 
It is readily accessible from all parts of the country. 

Athens, which is 1,000 feet above sea level, 
and apart from all miasmatic influences, is at the 
junction of the East Tennessee, Virginia and Geor- 
gia, and Tellico Railroads. From it can be seen 
the Smoky and Chilhowee Mountains. The cam- 
pus contains over twenty acres, upon which are six 
large buildings and five cottages. Here are located 
the Academic Department, the College of I^iberal 
Arts, and the Departments of Music, Art, Business 
and Elocution. 

Chattanooga is at the terminus of many rail- 
road lines, and is one of the most enterprising cities 



GENERAI. INFORMATION. 9 

in the South. The campus commands g-limpses of 
the Tennessee River, and an unobstructed view of 
Missionary and Walden's Ridg-es, and of Lookout 
iviountain. The building- is larg-e and commodious. 
This citv is the site of the professional schools — 
Theolog-y, Medicine and Law. 

FOUNDING. 

The nucleus of the present material equipment 
in Athens, came into the possession of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church by purchase in 1867. m the 
same year the Institution was incorporated as Kast 
Tennessee Wesleyan College, but was afterwards 
known as the East Tennessee Wesleyan University. 
In 1886 the charter was chang-ed, making- it Grant 
Memorial University. 

In the same year Chattanooga University was 
founded. In 1889 these two institutions were unit- 
ed under one Board of Trustees and under the one 
charter name of U. S. Grant University. 

The University is under the auspices of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and owes much of its 
usefulness to the liberality of friends and to the loy- 
al and intellig-ent support of the Holston, Blue 
Ridge, Alabama, Virginia, Georgia, Kentucky, Cen- 
tral Tennessee and Florida Conferences . 

ORGANIZATION. 

The University is organized with the follow. 
ing departments : 

I. The Academic Department. 



10 U. S. GRANT UNIVEKSI-TY. 

11. The Collegiate Department. 

III. The Theological Department. 

IV. The Medical Department. 
V. The Law Department. 

VI. The Pharmaceutical Department. 

VII. The Music Department. 

VIII. The Elocution Department. 

IX. The Business Department. 

X. The Art Department. 

MATERIAL EQUIPMENTS AT ATHENS. 

Besides university buildings which provide for 
class-rooms, libraries, society halls and chapel, Ben- 
nett Hall, with thirty-two excellent rooms, furnishes 
an attractive home for young ladies. Hatfield Hall 
has been put in thorough repair, and offers ample 
accommodations for thirty young men. 

The Ritter Industrial Home is an elegant new 
building under the auspices of the Woman's Home 
Missionary Society of the M. E. Church. [See full 
description on another page.] 

There are several cottages for the accommoda- 
tion of those desiring to board themselves. Many 
of our very best students take advantage of this 
cheap method, nor are they reduced in the estima- 
tion of the faculty and their fellow students because 
of their self-sacrifice and heroism. 

DEGREES. 

The University confers the following degrees : 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 11 

Bachelor of Arts (A. B.) upon all who complete 
the classical course of study. 

Bachelor of of Philosophy (Ph. B.) upon all 
who complete the philosophical course. 

Bachelor of Science (B. S.) upon all who com- 
plete the scientific course. 

. Bachelor of Theolog-y (S. T. B.) upon all Bache- 
lors of Art who complete the theolog^ical course. 

Bachelor of Music (Mus. B.) upon all who com- 
plete the course in music. 

Bachelor of Oratory (B. O.) upon all who com- 
plete the course in elocution and oratory. 

Also, the Post-g"raduate Deg"rees, Master of 
Arts (A. M.), Master of Philosophy (Ph. M.) and 
Master of Science (M. S.) upon Bachelors of Arts, of 
Philosophy and of Science, respectively, who after 
g-raduation, have successfully pursued studies un- 
der the direction of the Faculty for one year, or 
have eng-ag-ed for three years in literary or profes- 
sional work. 

The deg"ree, Doctor of Philosophy, will be con- 
ferred upon Masters of Science, Arts, or Philosophy, 
who successfully pass a written examination on the 
prescribed course of study. Information respecting- 
the course of study, subjects and details of examina- 
tion, expenses, etc., will be furnished upon applica- 
tion. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 
At Athens there are four literary societies, or- 



12 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

g-anized under the laws of the University : The 
Athenian and Philomathean, for gentlemen ; the 
Sapphonian and Knig"htonian, for ladies. All have 
separate halls for meeting-, a large, active member- 
ship and appropriate libraries. 

Each Literary Society will be permitted to give 
one public entertainment during the year, under the 
direction of a member of the Faculty. 

LECTURES. 

During the winter months, lecturers are en- 
gaged to address the students on social and literary 
topics. As a matter of general culture, these 
courses have been of great interest and benefit to 
all classes of students. 

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS CULTURE. 

The University is pre-eminently a Christian 
school. 

The young men maintain a Y. M. C. A. which 
holds regular weekly meetings. 

All students are required to attend religious 
exercises in the University Chapel on each school 
day, and public worship in one of the churches Sab- 
bath morning. 

GOVERNMENT. 

All regulations of the University relating to 
discipline will be in force during the intervals be- 
tween the terms. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 13 

The reg"ulations of the University are few and 
simple, based upon the usag-es of Christian homes 
and refined society. They appeal to the student's 
honor and self-respect, insist upon reg-ular habits, 
inculcate respect for law and order, and inspire a 
love for the g-entler and unselfish qualities that 
characterize the true g-entleman and the refined 
lady. A faithful observance of the hours set apart 
for study, and reg^ular and prompt attendance upon 
all classes, exercises, or other duties involved by the 
student's connection with the University, will be 
firmly insisted upon. 

Students will be held responsible for damag-e 
done by them to any property of the University. 

The association of ladies and gentlemen must 
be strictly in accordance with the regulations of the 
Faculty. 

No meeting- of students in the University build- 
ings for the transaction of business, and no exercises 
whatever to which the public are admitted, whether 
by society or individual students, shall be held, ex- 
cept with the consent of the Faculty previously ob- 
tained. 

The regulations of the University are printed 
in detail, together with such other information as 
may be of interest and benefit to new students, and 
may be obtained of any officer of the Faculty. 

It is desired that all students examine them 
carefully before matriculating, as all who become 
members of the school must agree to conform to 
them, and anyone who persists in their violation, or 



14 U.S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

who, in the judgrnent of the Faculty, exerts a. bad 
influence in the school, will be dismissed without 
hesitation. 

ELECTIVE STUDIES. 

Students not candidates for deg-rees may pur- 
sue studies in any of the deparments, provided they 
enter classes already formed, and are prepared to do 
successfully the work required. Candidates for de- 
grees will, in certain cases, be permitted to substi- 
tute work or select studies from other departments. 

All substitutions and selections must be of such 
character as shall not lower the grade of scholar- 
ship and culture. The approval of the Faculty, 
however, must be had in every such instance. 

RECITATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

Each student is required to have not less than 
fifteen nor more than twenty recitations per week, 
except by special permission of the Faculty. A rec- 
ord is kept by each Professor, showing- the g-rade 
of each student's daily work ; and this, tog^ether 
with the result of a thoroug^h written examination 
at the end of the term, must show an average of 70 
in the scale of 100 before the student can be passed 
in any study. 

New students must give satisfactor}- evidence 
as to their knowledge of the studies previously pur- 
sued by the class they wish to enter, either upon 
examination or by certificate of the principal of the 
school from which they come, and if, after one term, 



GENERAL INFORMATION. I5 

they are found to be ranked too high, will be re- 
duced. 

It is very important that students enter classes 
at the beg-inning- of the term, and keep in mind that 
constant, prompt attendance is necessary for the at- 
tainment of high grades. Students must not leave 
classes, nor take up new studies, except upon writ- 
ten approval of the proper officers. 

Candidates for degrees will not be permitted to 
pursue studies in advance of their class, nor will 
anyone be allowed to take studies for which he is 
not duly prepared. 

Students in the University will not be permit- 
ted to take lessons from anyone outside the Faculty, 
except by express permission. 

Students, not candidates for degrees, may pur- 
sue studies in any department for which they are 
prepared Certificates showing the amount and 
grade of work done by them, will be given upon 
application to the Dean of the department. 

EXPENSES. 

The entire history of the University has been 
characterized by the efforts of its Trustees and Fac- 
ulty to reduce the cost of a liberal education to such 
low figures that the poorest students need not be de- 
terred on account of their financial condition. It is 
a source of great satisfaction that the efforts made 
in this direction have been so successful, and that 
students in the humblest circumstances are here able 
to obtain a liberal education, and prepare thera- 



16 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

selves for any of the practical and learned profes- 
sions they may desire to pursue. 

It is, without doubt, true, that no other insti- 
tion of like g-rade, can offer such advantag-es for 
hig-her education at so little cost. 

While a number of students board themselves, 
and work to pa}^ their way, there are no social or 
class distinctions that separate them from those who 
have ample means. The University knows no aris- 
tocracy but character and merit, and the heroic ef- 
forts of poor students command universal respect 
and consideration from both students and Faculty. 

From the following' table of expenses the act- 
ual outlay in any department may be readily com- 
puted : 

Tuition in Regular College Classes, per term $10 00 

Tuition in Preparatory Department, per term ... . 6 00 

Ministerial students half above rates. 

Tuition in Music, per term 10 00 

Painting or Drawing, per term 20 lessons. 10 OC 

Bookkeeping, out of Course, per term .5 00 

Penmanship, per term 3 00 

Incidental Fee, paid by all, per term 3 00 

Students in Analytical Chemistry pay cost of material 

used, average, per term 3 00 

Use of Piano or Organ, per month 1 00 

Table Board in Hatfield Hall, Athens (gentlemen), per 

month 7 00 

Board in University building, Chattannojra, including 
room with heavy furniture, and heat and lisht, 

per week 3 00 

Room in Hatfield Hall, (gentlemen), with heavy furni- 
ture, per term 1 50 

Room for self-board, at Athens, with furniture, per 

term 1 50 



GENERAI, INFORMATION, 17 

Students board themselves at a weekly expense of 75c to 1 00 

Fee for Post-graduate Degree "10 00 

Fee for Bachelor's Degrees 5 00 

Fee for Academic Diplomas 3 00 

Board and room in Bennett Hall, (ladies), per week. ... 2 50 

Ladies boarding at Bennett Hall are expected to furnish 
their own bed linen and towels. 

Habits of economy and industry are encourag-ed 
in all, and every possible aid will be rendered 
worthy men and women in their efforts to keep their 
expenses low, and in surrounding- them with home- 
like influences. Each G. A. R. Post in the Depart- 
ment of Tennessee is offered free tuition for one 
student in Colleg^e, Preparatory or Mechanical class- 
es. Ministers of the Gospel, in the reg"ular work, 
and their families, will be allowed tuition in the 
reg"ular College and Preparatory Classes at one-half 
the reg"ular rates; but the Incidental Fee must be 
paid in full by every one who enters the University. 
No reduc4;ion will be made except in cases of pro- 
longed sickness or unavoidable absence during- 
more than one-half the term, when one-half the 
tuition paid will be refunded. 

All charg-es for tuition, incidentals and rent 
must be paid in advance, and no professor will re- 
ceive a student into his class except on presentation 
of a ticket showing- that settlement has been made 
with the treasurer of the Faculty. 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS. 



Realizing- the importance of thoroug-h and sj^s- 
tematic preparation for hig-her studies and extended 
courses, the Trustees have arrang-ed for concerted 
and harmonious action among" the principal Semi- 
naries and Academies that are tributary to the Uni- 
versity, -by the adoption of a uniform course of 
study leading- to the reg'ular college and technical 
classes. 

Besides the department at Athens the following- 
Scholastic Gymasia are comprised in the association, 
and students from them will be received without 
examination : 

Powell's Valley Academy, Well Springs, Teun, 
Fuller Institute, Chucky City, Teun. 
Roanoke Academy, Roanoke, Va. 
Leicester Academy, Leicester, N. C. 
Mt. Zion Academy, Mt. Zion, Ga. 
Oakland Academy, Laurel Gap, Tenn. 
Greeueville Collegiate Institute, Greeneville, Tenn. 
Parrottsville Academy, Parrottsville, Tenn. 
McLemoresville Academy, McLemoresville, Tenn. 
Bloomington College, Bloomington, Tenn. 
Kingsley Academy, Bloomingdale, Tenn. 
Mountain City Academy, Mountain City, Tenn. • 
Mallalieu Academy, Kinsey, Ala. 
Ellijay Academy, EUijay, Ga. 

18 



ADADKMIC DEPARTMENT. 19 

Graham Academy, Smyrna, N. C. 
Murphy Collegiate Institute, Sevierville, Tenn. 
Fair View College, Trap Hill, N. C. 
Sunbright Academy, Sunbright, Tenn. 

In this department three preparatory courses of 
study are offered : classical, philosophical and scien- 
tific, of three years each, leading- to corresponding- 
courses in the CoUeg-e of Liberal Arts. Even if only 
a limited time is available for attendance at school, 
it will be found preferable, in most cases, to take 
reg-ular work. 

Normal studies are provided for those who wish 
to prepare themselves for teaching-. 

A select course may be pursued by all who de- 
sire, provided the work chosen meets the approval 
of the Faculty, and the hours of recitation do not 
conflict. 

Reports of scholarship and deportment are 
made out for each student at the close of each term. 

A diploma will be conferred by order of the 
Board of IVustees upon any student completing a 
prescribed academic course. 

On presentation of such diploma, the student 
may enter the colleg^e classes without examination. 



20 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, 

ATHENS, TENN. 



There are three courses of study provided in 
this department . The classical, the philosophical 
and the scientific. The classical course leads to the 
deg-ree of bachelor of arts. It covers four years, 
and is desig-ned to afford opportunity for acquir- 
ing- a good general knowledge of a wide range of 
subjects, embracing ancient and modern languages, 
mathematics, history, natural science, literature 
and philosophy. The philosophical and the scien- 
tific courses are also arranged for four years, and 
lead to the degrees of bachelor of philosophy and 
bachelor of science, respectively. The aim, in all 
these courses, is general rather than special culture, 
and a symmetrical and carefully graduated develop- 
ment, rather than the exhaustive investigation of a 
few subjects to the neglect of others equally import- 
ant. 

LABORATORY. 

The Physical Laboratory is provided with ap- 
paratus for the illustration of the laws of Mechan- 
ics, Heat, Sound, Light and Electricity; the latter 
important subject being especially well represented 
by electric lamps of various styles and sizes, electric 
motor, magnetic telephones, telegraphic instru- 

23 



24 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

ments, with lines, microphones, induction coils and 
instruments of measurements. 

For aid in the study of Natural History, an ex- 
cellent collection of plants and animals has been 
provided. 

In addition to a larg-e number of minerals and 
fossils already arrang"ed in the Cabinet, a new col- 
lection of minerals, (.res and rocks has been receiv- 
ed the past year, a g-ift of the Smithsonian Institute, 
Washington, D. C. This is a valuable collection, 
containing one hundred and thirty representative 
specimens, and affords an excellent opportunity for 
practical study in Geolog-y and Mineralog-y. 

A fine microscope [Tolls], surveyors' instru- 
ments, including- compass, and transit, are among- 
the important pieces of apparatus. 



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TENNESSEE WESLEYAN COLLEGE 

AT" ENS, TN 37303 



28 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 



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SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY. 

liOCATED AT CHATTANOOGA. 



KACULTY, 



Bishop I. W. JOYCE, D. D., LL. D., Chancei^lor, 

And l/ccturer. 



Rev. R. J. COOKE, A.M., D.D., Vice-Chancei^lor, 

And Professor of New Testament Exegesis and His- 
torical Theology. 



Rev. G. T. NEWCOMB, A. M., B. D., Dean, 

And Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Exegesis. 

^ Rev. G. E. ACKERMAN, A. M., D. D., 

Professor of Systematic Theology. 

Rev. J. J. GARVIN, B. S., B. D., 

(Absent on Leave.) 
Professor of Practical Theology and Elocution. 



[29] 



Wliool of Tlieolo^, 

ClHATTANOCGA. TeNN. 




SCHOOL OF THKOIvOGY. 31 

GENERAL STATEMENT. 

The School of Theology of U. S. Grant Uni- 
versity is an institution for ministerial training, 
established on the same basis as other theolog- 
ical schools of the Church. 

The advance of general education and cult- 
ure, the increasing demand for thoroughly edu- 
cated and earnest ministers, both for home and 
foreign fields of labor, the widening of Christian 
thought, the constant improvement in means and 
methods of Christian activity, are among the im- 
perative reasons for special theological training 
on the part of those called of God to the sacred 
office of the Christian ministry ; and the aim of 
this institution is to equip such young men by a 
broad and thorough scholarship, that they will be 
able to serve in every good wor'k as the Church 
may demand. The following extracts from the 
Discipline give the voice of the Church concern- 
ing such schools : 

All candidates for our Ministry are earnestly advised to 
attend one or more of the Literary or Theological Institutions 
of our Church before applying to an Annual Conference for 
admission on trial. — Appendix, page 400. 

Our Theological Schools, whose Professors are nominated 
or confirmed by the Bishops, exist for the benefit of the whole 
Church, and it is the duty of the presiding elders and pastors 
to direct the attention of candidates for our Ministry to the 
advantages afforded in these institutions. — Paragraph 344, 
section 3, page 183. 

A Bishop may leave without appointment a preacher on 
trial, or a member of an Annual Conference desiring to attend 



32 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSPTY. 

any of our Literary or Theological Seminaries, whenever he 
shall be requested to do so by the Anniial Conference, and it 
shall seem to him expedient ; provided, however, that the 
time thus spent in school shall not count on that required for 
probation in the Annual Conference. — Paragraph 162, pages 
102 and 103. 



ADMISSION. 

Each candidate for admission to the regular 
Triennial Cours-e must produce a degree of A. B. 
from a reputable college, or satisfy the Faculty 
upon examination that he has had classical and 
literary training sufficient to pursue, without dif- 
ficulty, the designated studies. 

Candidates for admission who have had no 
classical training, but have a knowlege of the com- 
mon English branches, will be admitted to the 
English Course. 

Applicants who are members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church must produce a certificate 
of license to preach, or a recommendation from a 
quarterly conference, signed by the pastor and the 
presiding elder. The form of recommendation 
authorized by the General Conference of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church is as follows: 

" We, the members of the Quarterly- Conference of. 

hereby express our judgment that is called of God to 

the work of the ministry, and we recommend him as a suit- 
able person to become a student in the School of Theology of 
U. S. Grant University." 

Applicants from other Churches will present 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY. 33 

the certificate usually given by the denomination 
to which they belong. 

GRADUATION. 

The degree of S. T. B. (Sacrae Theologiae 
Eaccalaureus) will be conferred upon students 
who have received the degree of A. B. or an equiv- 
alent and have completed the prescribed course 
of study. 

Students not graduates of colleges but whose 
linguistic attainments and general scholarship 
have enabled them to be admitted to the regular 
course, will, after passing a satisfactory examina- 
tion, receive the diploma of the institution. 

Those who have pursued the English course 
for two full seminary years, and shall pass a sat- 
isfactory examination thereon, will receive the 
certificate of the institution. 

COURSE OF STUDY, 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Introduction— General Survey of Theolog-y, Order and Methods of 
Study, Biblical Literature, including Biog'raphical Account of Promi- 
nent Writers, Ancient and Modern. 

ExEGETicAL Theology — Hebrew Grammar, with Reading's from the 
Pentateuch. Critical Study of the English Bible; Methods of Use, Com- 
mentaries and Other Aids. Orig'in and History of Old Testament Canon; 
Geography and Archaeology. New Testament Greek; Critical and Exe- 
g'etical studies in the Gospels, Acts and Epistle to the Galatians. New 
Testament Canon; Genuineness of the New Testament — its Authenticity» 
Inspiration. Study of English New Testament; Scripture Geography; 
Manners and Customs of New Testament Times. 



34 u.. s. grant: university. 

Historical Theology— The Life of Christ (modera views). History 
of the Planting- and Training- of the Christian Church. Post-Apostolic 
History to the Reformation. General Survey of Ecclesiastical Litera- 
ture of the Period, including Patristics. 

Systematic Theology— Apologetics. Revelation Probable. Mir- 
acles. Prophecy. Evidences. History. The Being- of God. The At- 
tributes of God. Trinity. The Government of God. "^lan, a Revela 
tion of God." [Text Books— Raymond, Ackerman. Reference Books- 
Pope, Watson, Foster.] 

Practical Theology— Introduction. History of Preaching, An- 
cient and Modern. Lectures on the Office and Work of the Christian 
Minister. Brief Homiletical and Rhetorical Exercises. Natural Meth- 
ods of Debating. Elocution. Reading of Bible and Hymns. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

ExEGETicAL Theology— Hebrew: Critical and Exegetical Studies 
in the Pentateuch and the Historical Books. The Old Testament: 
Introduction— Language ; MSS.; Versions. The Pentateuch: Author- 
ship, Antiquity, Unity ; Modern Objections. Other Historical Books: 
Poetical Books; Major and Minor Prophets. Greek Testament: Studies 
in Romans, Ephesians. New Testament— Introduction: Hig-her and 
Lower Criticism; Lectures on MSS.; Versions; Textual Analysis and 
Expository Work. 

Historical Theology. — History of Christian Doctrine. Ecclesias. 
tical History from the Reformation Period to the Birth of John Wesley. 
Lectures on the Social Condition of Europe During the period; Lectures 
on the Counter-Reformation; on Causes of the Spiritual Djclension. 
Rationalism. 

Sy-stematic Theology.— Anthropology. Original Righteousness. 
Original Sin. The Fall, Soterioloq-.v. Theories of Salvation. The 
Atonement. Benefits of the Atonement. Extent. Conditions. Esclia- 
tology. Immortality. Intermediate State. The Resurrection. The 
Millennium. Second Advent. [Text Book — Raymond. Reference 
Books — Pope, Watson, Hibbard, Cooke.] 

Practical Theology.— Homiletics. Idea of the Sermon: The 
Building of the Sermon ; Material for Sermons; Illustrations: Delivery 
of the Sermon; Natural Methods; Extemporaneous preaching; Sermonic 
Criticism. Elocution: Voice Culture; Gesture; Reading of Bible and 
Hymns. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Exegetical Theology. — Hebrew. Studies in Poetical and Prophe- 
tical Books. Biblical Chaldee. Interpretation. Methods. Fig-ura- 
tive .Language: Parables; Allegories; Types; Symbols. New 
Testament Greek: Expository Studies in Hebrews and Pastoral Epis- 



SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY. 35 

ties; Lecture on History of New Testament Exegesis; Cunons of Inter- 
pretations; Selection of Commentaries and other Helps ; Recent Works 
on New Testament Kxegetical Theolog-y. 

Historical Theology.— General Church History from the Rise of 
Methodism to the Present Time. History of Methodism; Recent Move- 
ments and Tendencies in Religious Thought; Ecclesiastical Statistics 
and Review of Religious Progress. 

Systematic Thkology.— Theoretical Ethics. Obligation. Con- 
science. Virtue. Moral Culture. Practical Eethics. Self-culture. 
Duties to Our Fellow-men. Duties to God. Ecclesiology. The Church. 
Sacraments. Baptism. Subjects and Mode. The Lord's Supper. Na- 
ture's Efftcacy and Validity. Polity. Ministerial Duties and offices. 
Episcopacy. Ecclesiastical Law. [Text Books — Raymond, Hopkins, 
Methodist Episcopal Discipline. Reference Books — Harris & Henry, 
Pope, Hibbard.] 

Practical Theology— Lectures on Church Polity. The Pastoral 
Office and Duties. Relation of the Pastor to Social Questions. Plans 
and Building of Churches. Conduct of Revivals; Prayer-metings; Pr.blic 
Worship; Administration of the Sacraments: Ecclesiastical Law and the 
Discipliner Charities and Deeds of Church Property. Elocution: Voice, 
Gestures, Delivery of Sermons. 

The English Course corresponds in the main ivith the 
above, languages omitted. 

OTHER COURSES 

Of Study, Missionary, Post-Graduate, and special subjects will be mark- 
ed out as demands ma3' require. 



AUXILIARY FACILITIES. 

Library. — -The very valuable collection of 
Vv^orks in various languages bequeathed by the 
late Prof. J. Clarke Hagey, D. D., is especially 
rich in means for exegetical study. In addition 
to the free use of this collection, students will 
have access to the library of the University. 

Lectures. — Many of the most eminent min- 
isters, lecturers, lay and clerical, in Methodism, 
have preached or lectured every year, for the past 



36 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

fifteen years, before the University. The new or- 
ganization of the School of Theology will insure 
a large number of specialties in the various de- 
partments of Biblical Inquiry in addition to lec- 
tures on Present-day Questions of importance to 
the minister. 

The Theological year opens October 17th, 
1893, and closes May i6th, 1894. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition is free. An incidental fee of ten dol- 
lars per year is charged each student, payable 
half-yearly in advance. Room with furniture, 
except bed clothes, is seventy cents per week. 
(The above items have been paid for students in 
the past.) 



COLLKGE OF MEDICINE. 



Located in Chattanooga, and known as the 
Chattanooga Medical College, and embracing the 
services of about thirty instructors in the Faculty 
and Teaching corps. It occupies its own separate 
quarters in a large and imposing three-story brick 
edifice on the corner of Georgia Avenue and East 
Ninth Street, right in the business heart of the 
city, and close to both Central Railway Stations 
and all lines of the Electric Cars. The building 
will be largely remodeled inside during vacation 
so as to afford further increase of accommodations 
for the rapidly growing attendance as has been 
necessary each year since its organization. 

The Medical College has reached its fifth year 
in a most prosperous condition, having enjoyed 
an unexpectedly large patronage and support 
from a vast scope of territory extending from No- 
va Scotia to Texas and California, including rep- 
resentatives in its classes from very many of the 
intervening States. Last year its matriculation 
list bore one hundred and sixteen names, and it 
sent forth a large graduating class from this 
number. Inquiries from prospective students all 

[57] 



38 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

over the country have been received this year in 
excess of previous seasons at the present date — 
issuance of this Year Book — and the outlook is 
for a much increased patronage again during the 
coming season. 

The College is fully equipped for training 
students in all the branches customary in medical 
educational work, including Practical Anatomy, 
Laboratory Drill, and Clinical and Dispensary 
Clinical Experience. The whole aim of its Fac- 
ulty is to afford the best attainable inculcation of 
practical minutiae, and thus thoroughly indoctri- 
nate its pupils for capable and creditable perforni- 
ance of future daily duties in profesional life. 

Ji@"This College issues a large and special 
CATALOGUE OF ITS OWN, which can be had upon 
application, and wherein is fully set forth all re- 
quirements for matriculation and graduation, as 
well as the curriculum in detail, and a full list of 
the Faculty, students, and alumni in this Depart- 
ment of the University. Therefore further men- 
tion is unnecessary here, but can be obtained 
promptly when desired, b^^ addressing the Dean, 
E. A. COBLEIGH, M. D., 
or the Secretary, J. R. Rx\Thmell, M. D., 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 



CHATTANOOGA COLLEGE OF 
PHARMACY. 

[Pharmactutical Department of Grant University. ) 



Chattanooga is rapidly coming to the front as 
an educational center; its natural facilities tend 
to make it so, situated as it is, the gateway of the 
central South, in the midst of the Cumberland 
Mountains, a city with every opportunity that 
tends to make a progreseive people. The College 
of Pharmacy that is just organized is a depart- 
ment of the Grant University, though managed as 
a separate and distinct institution. It enters upon 
its fifth year with a careful and well selected fac- 
ulty, among whom are Harry Wise, Dean; Dr. 
W. A. Applegate, Dr. M. Block. The session 
opens September 17, 1893, and lasts six months. 
The requisites for admission are the same as those 
of all other recognized colleges of pharmacy. The 
entire expense for the two sessions, including di- 
ploma fee, is $110. The lecture and laboratory 
hours are to be so arranged as to aifbrd students 
free opportunity to fill active positions in drug 
stores in the city, if such is their desire. 
For prospectus and further information address 
Harry Wise, 709 Market Street, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

[39] 



CHATTANOOGA COLLEGE OF LAW. 

{Laif Departnioii of Grajit University.) 



KACULTY. 



HON. D. M. KEY, Dean. 

Ex-U. S. Postmaster-General; Judg-e of U. S. District Court. 

JUDGE LEWIS SHEPHERD, 

Attorney of East Tennessee and Queen & Crescent R. R. Systems. 

JUDGE C. D. CLARK, 

Attorney of Louisville & Nashville R. R. System. ^~-^; 

HON. XENOPHON WHEELER, 

Ex-United States District Attorney. 

HON. C. D. McGUFFEY, 

Attorne3' of Cincinnati Southern R. R. Trustees. 

FRANCIS MARTIN, ESQ., 

Ex-City Attorney of Chattanooga. 

The next reg-ular session of this school will 
open on Monday, October 17, 1893, and will con- 
tinue into the following- April, 1894. 

REQUIRiBMENTS FOR ADMISSION: 

For admission to the Junior Class of the Law 
School no examination will be required; but stu- 
dents are advised to read some elementary text book 

[40] 



SCHOOL OF LAW. 41 

treating" of law in g-eneral, such as "Walker's 
Introduction to American Law," or "Pomeroy's 
Municipal Law." 

Applicants for admission in the senior class 
must pass a written examination in the junior 
course studies. 

GRADUATION. 

To g-raduate in this school and receive its di- 
ploma students must pass a satisfactory written 
examination on all the subjects included in the 
whole course of study. . 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Junior Class. Senior Class. 

Elementary Law Robinson Negotiable Instruments ..Tiedniaii 

Law of Contracts Bishop Real Property Tiedman 

Domestic Relations Schouler Equity Jurisprudence Bisphart 

Partnership Parsons Constitutional Law Cooiey 

Corporations Boone Equitj' Pleadin<r Li'be 

Torts Cooley Law of Evidence Reynolds 

History of a Law Suit Carothers Gibson's "Suits in Chancery." 



The entire course is arrang-ed to occupy two 
terms, but students can, by application, g-raduate 
in one colleg-iate year if the requirements are fully 
complied with. 

LECTURES. 

During- the session there will be a regular 
course of lectures delivered to the Senior class by 
the several members of the Faculty. The subjects 
of these lectures will be announced from time to 
time during- the. term, and will cover all the impor- 



42 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

tant topics treated in the various text books above 
tnentioned. 

MOOT COURTS 

Will be held each week under the direction of 
the Dean, at which some one of the Professors will 
preside while the case under consideration is arg^ued 
bj the students participating-. 

Moot Clubs will also be formed for the purpose 
of g-iving- students exercise in pleading's, practice 
and arg-ument. 

EXPENSES. 

Matriculation Fee (only once exacted) S 5 00 

Tuition Fee (each term) 50 00 

Diploma Fee (at g-raduation) 5 00 

Partial course if desired may be taken at pro- 
portional rates. 

The text books used in the school will cost 
(about) $30 for the Junior session, and $40 for the 
Senior year. 

Many students are able to make arrang-ements 
with different law firms in the city by which thej 
are permitted the use of their libraries, thus ma- 
terially reducing- the orig-inal outlay g-enerall}" 
necessary for text books. 

The cost ot room and board, including fuel and 
lig-hts, is as low in Chattanoog-a as in any other 
city of like size in the South. 

Any further information desired can be obtain- 
ed by application to Francis Martin, Secretary of 
the Faculty, Chattanoog-a, Tennessee. 



MOUNTAIN CITY BUSINESS 
COLLEGE. 

{Co'tnniercial Department of U. S Grant University.') 



This is not a "department" in the sense usually 
applicable when speaking- of commercial work in 
the literary schools, but a complete and thoroug-hl}^ 
equipped business college, with every facility af- 
forded by any other commercial school. The 
teachers are all specialists in their work, fitted for 
it by special training-, and experience in business, 
as well as experience in teaching- in leading- busi- 
ness colleg-es. 

The work of this department is divided into 
two courses: The Business Course, and The Short- 
hand Course. The Business Course includes Double 
Entry Bookkeeping, Business Correspondence, Com- 
mercial Correspondence, Commercial Arithmetic, 
Practical Grammar, Business Forms, Penmanship, 
Commercial Law, Banking, Spelling, and Office 
Practice. The Shorthand Course includes Short- 
hand, Typewriting, Business Correspondence, 
Grammar, Punctuation, Business Forms, Legal 

[43] 



44 BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

Forms, Spelling, Penmanship, Manifolding-, Letter 
Copying-, and Office Dictation. 

Students entering either course of this depart- 
ment advance as rapidly as their ability and appli- 
cation make possible, since the work is larg-ely indi- 
vidual. 

Special advantag-es are offered the students in 
boarding, which, together with furnished rooms, 
can be had at a price much below that found else- 
where. In being- able to g-reat:y limit the expense 
of living-, and at the same time give all the benefits 
of a business education which are gained only in 
a large business center, we claim unsurpassed 
facilities. 

Write for separate illustrated catalogue, which 
is mailed free upon application, and gives very full 
information relative to the work of this college. 

Address, 
MOUNTAIN CITY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 

Chattanooga, Tennessee. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 



The desig-n of this department is to furnish 
thoroug-h instruction in the various branches of 
music. With this object in view, systematic study 
will be g-iven to the fundamental principles of 
music; to the different forms and periods, and to the 
works of the masters. 

Students will be received at any time, and, 
after satisfactory examination, will be g^iven due 
credit for the prog-ress already made. 

The time necessar}^ to complete the course can 
not be stated in advance, but will depend upon the 
•previous attainments of the students; upon their 
ability, and upon the amount of time devoted to 
the study. At least one j^ear of resident study in 
the department will be required before g-raduation. 

To meet the increasing- demand for well quali- 
fied teachers of music, special attention will be 
g-iven those desiring" to teach. Classes will be or- 
g-anized for instruction in the best methods of 
teaching-; and in these, students may g-ive lessons 
under the direction of the teacher. The Normal 
work is free to all receiving" regular instruction in 
the department. 

[45] 



46 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Among the advantag-es offered, none are of 
greater importance for general culture than the 
studies in Musical Literature, together with the 
recitals and concerts that will be given from time 

Among the advantages offered, none are of 
greater importance for general culture than the 
to time. Advanced students will also receive drill 
in ensemble playing. ' 

While no student will be allowed to take part 
in any public musical entertainment without the 
consent of the teacher, all students are required to 
assist in such work when they can do so with credit 
to themselves and the department. 

VOCAL CULTURE. 

GRADE I. 

Position of the throat and mouth. Delivery of 
the voice. Ascending and descendinaf passages. 
Melodic phrases. 

GRADE II. 

Vowel and consonant elements. Extension of 
compass. Flexibility of the voice. Study of enun- 
ciation. Major and minor scales. Ballads, songs, 
arias, of moderate difficulty. 

GRADE III. 

Chromatic and minor scales. The staccato. 
Portamento. The swell. Various exercises for 
flexibility. Slow trill. Difficult exercises in Color- 
ature. Embellishments, etc. Study and building 
up of repertoire of church, concert, oratorio, and 
operatic music. 



DEPARTMENT OF ELOCUTION 
AND ORATORY. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 

This school is desig^ued to teach Elocution as 
an art, resting" upon absolute laws of nature, ex- 
plained and illustrated by exact rules of science, 
and to g"ive a thoroug-h and systematic training in 
all the principles upon which the art is based. 

Each principle is presented as a vocal culture, 
then as an element of expression as found in 
nature. -The voice is developed to produce the ele- 
ments, the ear trained to detect them, and the mind 
educated to apply them in the delivery of all styles 
of composition. 

The school is desig^ned also as a means of 
liberal culture; its aim is not only to make readers, 
but thinkers as well. 

It embraces such a system of personal and lit- 
erary culture as to be of the hig-hest value, not only 
to those who have a professional purpose in view, 
but also to ladies and g-entlemen desiring- a pleasant 
accomplishment. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

It is difficult to express in a brief form the 
course of instruction g^iven, but the following- out- 

[47] 



48 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

line may, however, grive an idea of the work re- 
quired. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Respiration, Calisthenics, Or- 
thog-raph}^ Voice Culture, Elements of Vocal Ex- 
pression, Elements of Gesture, Exercises for Prac- 
tice, Eng-lish Literature, Rhetoric, English Gram- 
mar, Philosoph}^ of Expression. 

Second Term. — Review, Voice Culture, Del- 
sarte Gymnastics, Pitch, Inflection, Waves, Rhyth- 
mus. Cadence, Melody, Emphasis, Invention of 
Gesture, Action Analysis, Miscellaneous Readings, 
English Literature, Rhetoric, Physical and Vocal 
Culture, Delsarte, Analysis, Dramatic Action, Im- 
personation, Vocal Culture. 

Third Term. — Review, Physical and Voice 
Culture, Shakespeare. Stage Business, Impersona- 
tion, Delsarte, Pantomimic Expression and Gesture, 
Dramatic Readings, Orators and Oratory. 

senior year. 

This year will be devoted to the higher forms 
of Vocal, Verbal and Pantomimic Expression; to 
the study of Shakespeare; study of Synthetic Phi- 
losophy of Expression, and other work left to the 
selection of the Director. 

Candidates for g-raduation from the one year 
course are required to take at least forty private 
lessons. 



ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT. 49 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

The body was created that it might serve the 
soul. If the mind and heart are educated to the 
noblest thoughts and feelings, the body should be 
educated to express them. We consider the body 
the natural servant of the soul, and cultivate it ac- 
cordingly. 

VOICE CULTURE. 

The first, greatest, and most difficult thing is 
the direction of the tone; that is, focusing it to ex- 
press the different shades of meaning. Therefore 
much attention is given to this subject. 

DELIVERY OF SERMONS. 

A sermon is a direct appeal to the highest sen- 
timents and most disinterested motives of the soul. 
1st, it must instruct; 2d, it must convince; 3d, it 
must move. These three principles must be har- 
moniously blended in the voice and manner of the 
preacher. 

Special pleasure will be taken in assisting min- 
isters of the Gospel desiring our aid. 

INTSRUCTION TO STAMMERERS. 

Stammerers are treated in the most practical 
and scientific manner. 

The Principal has had a great deal of experi- 
ence with students of defective speech, and in 
KVKRY CASE with perfect satisfaction to both 
teacher and student. We can, therefore, speak 
most encouragingly to any such. 



50 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

PUBLIC RECITALS. 

Each member of the graduating' class is re- 
quired to g"ive a prog^ram of reading's and recita- 
tions before an audience of invited g"uests. These 
are occasions of marked interest, the performers 
always being greeted by refined and cultivated 
audiences. 

JUVENILE CLASSES. 

It remains no long-er a question, but an ac- 
knowledg-ed fact, that childhood is the proper ag-e 
for beg^inning- the study of elocution. In youth, 
before habits upon faults have rendered the indi- 
vidual stilted and self-conscious, the body, mind 
and spirit are pliable and receptive. In this mat- 
ter surely, "An ounce of preservation is worth a 
pound of restoration." We have had scores of 
children under our instruction, and we always con- 
sider it a g-reat pleasure. All under 14 years of ag-e 
are admissible to these classes. 

COST OF INSTRUCTION. 

For each term, class tuition $ 5 00 

For one sixty-minutes private lesson i 50 

For one thirty minutes private lesson 75 

For 2o one-hour lessons 25 00 

H'or 20 half- hour lessons 13 00 

For Calisthenics, per term, 15 lessons 2 00 

For Juvenile Class, per term, 20 lessons 3 00 

Graduation and diploma fee 5 00 

Note. — Any further information will be cheerfully given 
on application. 

Address the Principal, 

FRANKLIN A. PEAKE. 

Athens, Tenn. 



COMMERCIAL DKPARTMKNT 

BUSINESS COURSE. 



This course has been provided to meet the 
wants of those desiring- a commercial education. It 
offers a thoroug-h course in those branches which 
are essential to success in the business world; viz: 

Book-keeping-, Business Forms, Arithmetic, 
Commercial Law, Penmanship, Practical Grammar 
and Correspondence. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

FIRST TERM. 

Book-keeping (5). Commereia] Law (2). 

Arithmetic (5). Penmauship (£) 

I raetical Grammar and Correspondence (1). 

\ 

SECOND TERM. 

Book-keeping, Banking and Bnsiness Practice (5). 

Commercial Law (2). Arithmetic (5). 

Penmanship (5). 

Practical Grammar and Correspondence (1). 

Figures in parenthesis denote the number of 
recitations per week. 

Students may enter at the opening- of any col- 
lege term. Those who complete the prescribed 
course satisfactorally receive the diploma of the 
University. 

Any further information will be cheerfully 
g-.iven, on application to the principal, 

E. C. HORN, Athens, Tenn. 

[51] 



ART DEPARTMENT. 



This department has for its object the cultiva- 
tion and promotion of the Fine Arts throug-h prac- 
tice and criticism. 

Instruction will be g-iven in oil and w^ter color, 
pastel, crayon, free-hand drawing-, china painting 
and portraiture in crayon and pastel. 

An annual exibition of the works of art pro- 
duced by the students during the year is held dur- 
ing the last week of the collegiate jv'ear. 

[52] 



RITTER INDUSTRIAL HOME 

ATHENS, TENN. 



FOR YOUNG WOMEN. 



MRS. F. V. CHAPMAN, Superintendent. 
Miss Belle George, Teacher in Sewing- Dep't. 



This "Home" has been, during- the past two 
years a constituent part of the University, and has 
fully demonstrated its usefulness and the popularity 
of domestic training- in the South. 

The plan of instruction is modeled after the 
best features of the world-famous Mount Holyoke 
School, founded by Mary hjon, the most eminent 
teacher of her ag-e. 

Domestic instruction is now becoming- the most 
popular branch in Vassar, N. Y., and Auburndale, 
Mass., as well as other famous schools for women. 

The house is new, the rooms are larg-e, lig-ht 
and well ventilated. The laundry and kitchen are 
provided w^ith all the modern appliances to render 
the work li^ht and eas}^ to be performed. 

The design of the manag-ement is to make this 
department a real home to its inmates. Each g-irl 

[53] 



RITTER INDUSTRIAL HOME. 55 

m the Home is expected cheerfully to contribute 
her share of service and loyal interest toward 
makingf it a delig"htful place for all. The domestic 
duties are arrang-ed* with such careful method that 
all the labor g-ives the students but the needed 
healthful exercise, without interfering- with the 
prog"ress in academic work. 

Reg-ular class instruction is g-iven in cooking-, 
plain sewing- and dressmaking-, for which no extra 
charg-e is made. 'The sewing- classes g-ive opportu- 
nity/for g-irls to do their own sewnng-, without'inter- 
fering- with their prog-ress in their school work. 
The domestic work is graded as are other school 
duties, and constitutes a part of the basis upon 
which class standing's are made up, and promotions 
from class to class are made. 

Pupils living- in the "Home" not only g-et the 
benefit of the domestic instruction, but the system 
of co-operative housekeeping- very much reduces the 
expenses of attending- the University. The "Home" 
is manag-ed entirely in the interest of the students; 
not to make money, but simply to pay running- ex- 
penses. 

Furnished rooms, fuel, lig-hts and board are 
provided at $7.00 per month. Kach month's dues 
are payable in advance. No g-irl entering- the Home 
will be excused from her share of the domestic du- 
ties, except, of course, in case of illness. The dis- 
cipline is mild, but firm. 

Each g-irl entering- the Home must bring- satis- 
factory testimonials of character and capacity; and 
any failure of loyal co-operation may be considered 



56 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

sufficient reason for severing- her connection with 
the school. 

The Home will accommodate fifty pupils, and 
is in itself the Practice School for all the theoretic 
instruction. The boarding- expenses can be consid- 
erably reduced by taking- this course of domestic 
training-. 

The society having- the Home in charg-e can 
give help sufficient to pay part of the expense, to 
a limited number of pupils of special promise. 
Persons wishing- to avail themselves of this help 
must apply early to Mrs. F. V. Chapman, Athens, 
Tennessee, and arrang-e all the details before 
leaving- home. None need apply who cannot 
meet part of the expense, for demands for help are 
so urg-ent and so numerous that each applicant • 
must do her utmost to help herself. Only those 
who have the force of character to help themselves 
merit help from others. 

j§@"All non-residents are required to enter the 
Home or Board at Bennett Hall, unless they have 
near relatives living- in the villag-e. 



Students. 

AT ATHENS. 



POST GRADUATES. 

Carroll, P. P Kansas- 

Mcmturff, D. N California 

Madison, Robert L .Culhowee, N. C 

^ COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

SENIORS. 

Bailey, Belle - Bayleyton, Tenn 

Lowe J. Grant ^ Pin Hook, " 

Radebaug-h, William i. . Danville, 111 

Zeller, Julius C. ^ Spring Bay, 111 

JUNIORS. 

Bynura, James L- ■^ Weavers, Ala 

Brendle, Buford A. ■'' Mortimer, Tenn. 

Eckel, H. Odie 2 Morristown, Tenn. 

Gilbert, u\higa,\\ 2 Lewisville, Ind 

Hicks, Charles H. ^ Olla, Tenn. 

Harrison, Corey E ^ Athens, Tenn. 

[57] 



58 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Mitchell, Harry L ^ Athens, Tenn 

Bay, James A. 2 Story, Ala 

Kidenour, N. Sherman ^ Ag-ee, Tenn 

Westbrook, J. Robert ^ Spring- Garden, Ala 

SOPHKMORKS. 

Hug-hes, J. B. '^ Earnest, Tenn 

Parsons, William A. ^ Alco, N. C 

Stricklm, Matthew P. 1 Moon, Tenn 

Walker, Kmma K. ^ Athens, " 

Weems, Charles K. 2 Mohawk, 

FRESHMEN. 

Craig-, Alvis ^ Andersonville, Tenn 

Chappell, J. Elbert 1 Dell, Va 

Dorsett, Robert A. ^ Murphree's Valley, Ala 

Dail, Lizzie ^ Clinton, Tenn 

Eckles, Mae E. ^ Tupelo, Miss 

Gobbell, Isaac H. ^ Waynesbury, Tenn 

Hassler, Simeon S. ^ Rocky Face, Ga 

Kell, Riley A. 1. , Cedar Grove, Ga 

Kelly Charles F. ^ Williamsburg, Tenn 

Miller, S. Ernest ^ Johnson City, '' 

Newton, William H. ^ Kinsey, Ala 



prp:paratory. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Armstrong, William L Blount Springs, Ala 

Avis, Carroll R Athens. Tenn 

Barnard, Charles J . . . : Celeste, Texas 



STUDENTS. 59 

Bess, William C Patt's Creek, Va! 

Caldwell, Harry R Athens, Tenn 

Caldwell, William M Athens, 

Caldwell, Stella, M Brooklyn, N. Y 

Cass, Lews W Elizabethton, Tenn 

Clayton, Kynett Summertown, " 

Cooper, William T Kimbro's Store, " 

Curvin, Georg-e W Athens, " 

T^kles, Bernice L Tupelo, Miss 

Erwin, Doctor M .'. . Big- Spring-, Tenn 

Gaston, Fannie Athens, " 

Gallaher, William M Moon, " 

Gettys, Richard Athens, " 

Hawk, Henry M 

Hill, Jackson J. . .t . . . ., Resaca, Ga 

Horn, Edward C Little Chapel, Ohio 

Huffine, William F Johnson City; Tenn 

Humphrey, Albert S Blue Spring-s, " 

Hutsell, Keturah Athens, " 

Jackson, John A Pin Hook, " 

Lester, Charles W Graveston, " 

Looney, Robert N Cedar Grove, Ga 

McKeldin, Annie Athens, Tenn 

Morgan, Mag-g-ie I Daj'ton, " 

Neal, Rosa . Athens, " 

Pierce, Nelson A Elg^in, 111 

Roeder, Ludwig- A Athens, Tenn 

Roeder, Louise E " " 

Roberts, Fred W Ang-eline, N. C 

Russell, Ida M Morristown, Tenn 

Rutherford, J. Maynard Corryton, " 

Scarbroug-h, Calvin H Scarbroug-h, " 

Shipley, Bertie K Athens, " 



60 U.S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Smalling-, David R Watauga, Tenn 

Taber, Joseph B Fort Motte, S. C 

Ulrey, Thomas H Athens, Tenn 

Ulrey, Lottie M 

Weems, Livie A Mohawk, 

SECOND YEAR. 

Adams, Lewis O Bristol, Tenn 

Adams, John W Adamsville, Ala 

Aytse, Cora Athens, Tenn 

Baker, John C. C Dare, 

Barnes, Henry P Morris Chapel, 

Bennett, Charles A Athens, 

Billing-s, Montg-omery D Welcker, Mines, 

Black, Ausburn W Athens, 

Black, M. Hemard 

Bolton, Ira M 

Burke, Howard R " 

Booth, William R Erwin, 

Bushong-, Maggie L Sweetwater, 

Callahan, Alvin " 

Cox, Richard P Bear, 

DeRossett, Sampson Grassy Cove, 

Dyer, George W Birming^ham, Ala 

Kasterly, Herbert T Little Chucky, Tenn 

Edwards, William H Coal Creek; 

Erwin, Andrew J Big Spring, 

Everett, Julia L Athens, 

(.^^ibbs, John B Church Grove, 

Glaze, Lurah J Mouse Creek, 

Harrison, Elbert N Henshaw, 

Harris, J. Berch Corrvton, 



STUDKNTS. 61 

Heatherlj, John W. .", . Athens, Tenn 

Harrison, Genevieve " " 

Holland. Robert T Scottsv^ille, Ky 

Holling-sworth, Georg-e E Jacksboro, Tenn 

Holling-sworth, William H " " 

Hornsby, Robert C Athens, " 

Huffine, Charles M Paint Rock, " 

Humphris, Claude B Rich Patch, Va 

Johnson, Martha A Flenniken, Tenn 

Knig-ht, Ralph P Athens, " 

Lindsay, Jerry M . . . Rosewood, Ala 

Ivowery, Andrew J Fort Payne, " 

Miller, Cora C Athns,Tenn 

Millican, Charles F Rock wood, " 

Morg"an, Lorenzo T Cedar Grove, Ga 

Newcombe, R. Burg-oyne Manistee, Mich 

Newton, Helon L Kinsey, Ala 

Patterson, Helen R Vineland, Tenn 

Pope, James G Sparta, Tenn 

Roeder, Fay Athens, " 

Rog-ers, Jesse L Old Town, " 

Rutherford, Lillie Corryton, " 

Ryan, Thomas A Grove Oak, Ala 

Ryan, James L Thirty Nine, " 

Ryan, William C Elizabeth ton, Tenn 

Sivils, Edg-ar W Raht, " 

Smith, Nannie Heflin, Ala 

Snyder, Charles M Stribbling- Spring's, Va 

Zieg-ler, Ida Rock Creekj Ten 



62 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Abbey, Wilmer L Brooklyn, N. Y 

Abrames, Ada Knoxville, Tenn 

Alexander, Mary E Griffitts, " 

Atkinson, Matilda Roslin, " 

Aytes, Mag-g-ie Athens, " 

Bassing-er, Tennie " • " 

Black, J. Virg-il 

Black, Minnie 

Blankenship, James G Knoxville, " 

Bolton, Herbert, D Athens, " 

Bolton, Helen A 

Bruner, Arthur Georg-iana, Fla 

Bushong-, James R Sweetwater, Tenn 

Berry, Asbury L Massey, Ala 

Burson, Noa Birming-ham, " 

Caldwell, Adda B Brooklyn, N. Y 

Cass, Roma Athens, Tenn 

Chase, Emma Ellijay, Ga 

Chase, Dean W " 

Chase, H. Theodore " 

Chambers, Jerrj- Cleveland, Tenn 

Comer, James E Jacksboro, " 

Crow, Fred T Athens, " 

Dorsett, Fannie Murphree's Valley, Ala 

Duckworth, Henry M Athens, Tenn 

Foster, Laura " " 

Farmer, Alexander " " 

Ford, A. C Reg-ret, " 

Ford,S.H 

Fryar, May Athens, " 

Fryar, Rufus H.. " " 

Galloway, William D Glenville, N. C 



STUDENTS. 63 

Gass, Leander E Cleveland, Tenn 

Gaston, Kate P Athens, " 

Gilbert, Mathew A Knoxville, Tenn 

Glaze, Ella Mouse Creek, " 

Glaze, Grant " 

Georg-e, Alice V Athens, " 

Gorman, Estella ..Grand View, " 

Hall, Thomas C Kensing-ton, Ga 

Harbert,. Lafayett L Morris Chapel, Tenn 

Harbert, Joseph L. " " " 

Hartfield, Ola Rosewood, Ala 

Henderson, Lute. . Athens, Tenn 

Herbert, Susie Chattanoga, " 

Hennessee, Emanuel A Morg-anton, N. C 

Hill, Janey P .Pelham, S. C 

Hicks, Octavia. Rural Retreat, Va 

Hinkle, James M ..Gerber, Ga 

Hicks, Henson D Clinton, Tenn 

Holling-sworth, Leon F Jacksboro, '^ 

Hunnicutt, Mary 1 .Heflin, Ala 

Hunnicutt, Mattie " " 

Hutsell, Loyd Athens, Tenn 

Humphrey, Ve"rg-il O Blue Springs, 

Hyatt, Eddie D Whitesburg-, " 

Hyatt, Bobbie. 

Isenberg, Fannie Knoxville, Tenn 

Ivms, Eugene Athens, ' ' 

Jackson, Belle Pin Hook, " 

Jackson, Sam. H " " " 

Jackson, Fannie E " " " 

Jones, Andrew J Massey, Ala 

Jones, John W Coffee Ledg-e, Tenn 

Julian, Urbie Chatata, " 



6-1: U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Kelley, Lucy M Athens, Tenn 

Kelley, Eddie M 

Lewis, Edg-ar R " " 

Lindley, Julia Glen Ing-lis, N. C 

Long-, Wilbur R Athens, Tenn 

Lowe, Charles C Rhea Spring's, " 

Love, James C Erwm, " 

Mag-ill, Mary E Tunnel Hill, Ga 

Matlock, May Riceville, Tenn 

Markin, Ethel E Williamsburg-, Ky 

Matthews, Etta Athens, Tenn 

Miller, Georg-e L Burke, ' ' 

Morg-an, Calvin W Cedar Grove, Ga 

Morris, Ada Hefiin, Ala 

Morris, Nora L Bowdon, Ga 

Montg-omery, Edg-ar P Paint Rock, Tenn 

McGrew, Mag-g-ie Long-'s Mills, " 

Myers, Rosa B Annex, Va 

Neff, Hug-h H x\thens, Tenn 

Prentiss, Ruth E Chattanoog-a, 

Reynolds, Hug-h D Gudger, '' 

Reynolds, Grace M Ashville, N. C 

I^ussell, Allie Morristown, Tenn 

Russell, Alexander C Jacksboro, " 

Scates, Walker J Ebenezer, " 

Simpson, Charles W Piney, " 

Sharp, William M Fossil, Tenn 

Sampson, Tennie Athens, Tenn 

Smith, James M " " 

Smith Lora Pin Hook, " 

Stanfield, Mary E Athens, " 

Sutton, Paralee Culberson, N. C 

Taylor, Addie E Chattanoog-a, Tenn 



STUDENTS. 65 

Trusty, Grant G Providence, Tenn 

Tipton, John H Elizabeth ton, " 

Umensetter, Mabel Lookout Mountain, " 

Umensetter, Madg-e " " " 

Verity, Mabel E. W Harriman, " 

Wallin, Robert D Cedar Grove, Ga 

Warner, Melle W Knoxville, Tenn 

Waddell, Nannie E TIenshaw, ' ' 

West,. Ollie M Athens, " 

West, Victor R; 

Williams, W. D. C 

Wittwer, Edward J Adelphi, Ohio 

Wilhite, David C Amanda, Tenn 



SPKCIAL STUDI^NTS. 

Adams, Lulu Chattanooga, Tenn 

Baber, Robert Edwardsville, Ala 

Baker, Chester Athens, Tenn 

Banks, Cora Chattanooga, 

Bledsoe, Emma Turtle Town, 

Bruner, M ay Athens, 

Bushong, Charles Sweetwater, 

Casey, Annie Athens, 

Casey, Bertie 

Cannon, Burke 

Chase, Robert 

Childress, Robert • 

Cleage, John .... 

Cooper, Thomas 

Crozier, Walter Athens, Tenn 

Curvin, Isaac A " " 



66 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Ellis, Effie Athens, Tenn 

Ellis, Marie 

Fenlason, Ruby 

Fitch, Mag-g-ie 

Fitch, Henry 

Fuller, Fannie Knoxville, ' ' 

Hendricks, Carrie Athens, " 

Hicks, Aaron Hind's Creek, " 

Hodg-e, Mattie Athens, " 

Holland, Belle Chattanoog-a, " 

Humphreys, Horace Athens, ' ' 

Humphreys, Frank " " 

Hyatt, Jottie Whitesburg, " 

Hyatt, Frank 

Jackson, Luke Pin Hook, ' 

Jones, Sam Massey, Ala 

Jones, Finous " " 

Kelly, Joseph Athens, Tenn 

Kittrell, Florence " " 

Lawton, William " " 

Lawton, Lester " " 

Matlock, Rose " " 

Mangleburg, Christina Pelham, S. C 

Marston, Bessie Athens, Tenn 

Marston, Maggie " " 

McChristian, George Sweetwater, " 

McDonald, Eug-ene Athens, " 

McSwain, Helen Edwardsville, Ala 

Neal, Minnie Sunbright, Tenn 

Nicholson, Lizzie Chattanooga, " 

Nicholson, Nola Patty, " 

Owen, Roger Athens, Tenn 

Powell, Charles Spring City, " 



STUDENTS. 67 

Roeder, Cuthbert Athens, Tenn 

Scott, Mag-g-ie 

Stanley, Lena Mortimer, " 

Thomas, Amanda Bluff City, " 

Umensetter, Edith Lookout Mountain, " 

Ward John, Athens, " 

Wrig-ht, Krnest " " 

Wrig-ht, Marg-aret " " 

Wright, Hugh .. 



MUSIC DBPARTMKNT. 

Abrames, Ada Knoxville, Tenu 

Bolton, Helen A Athens, " 

Caldwell, Adda B Brooklyn, N. Y 

Dodd, Lulu Athens, Tenn 

Eckles, Mae E Tupelo, Miss 

Eckles, Bernice L " " 

Marston, Bessie , • • • • Athens, Tenn 

Matthews, Etta '* " 

Myres, Rosa B Annex, Va 

Neal, Minnie Athens, Tenn 

Russell, Ida M Morristown, " 

Rutherford, Lillie Corryton, " 

Schuman, Carl Athens, " 

Wrig-ht, Ernest " " 

Wright, Marg-aret " " 



68 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

ART di:partment. 

Bolton, Herbert D. Athens, Tenn 

Caldwell, Stella M Brooklyn, N. Y 

Isenberg-, Fannie Knoxville, Tenn 

Roberts, Minnie Quincy, 111 

Patterson, Helen R Vineland, Tenn 

Ross, Lena W Mason, Ohio 

Rutherford, Lillie Corryton, Tenn 

Shelton, May Athens, ,, 



ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT. 

Abrames, Ada Knoxville, Tenn 

Alexander, Mary E Griffitts, 

Adams, Louis O Bristol, 

Banks, Cora Chattanooga, 

Bailey, Belle Baileyton, 

Bailey, Nina " 

Booth, William R Erwin, 

Bledsoe, Emma Turtle Town, 

Burson, Nora Birming-ham, Ala 

Bushong-, Mag-g-ie L Sweetwater, Tenn 

Cass, Lewis W Elizabthton, " 

Casey, Annie Athens, " 

Caldwell, Stella Brooklyn, N. Y 

Casey, Bertie Athens, Tenn 

Chappell, J. Elbert Dell, Va 

Chase, Emma Ellijay, Ga 

Dail, Lizzie Clinton, Tenn 

Dorsett, Fannie Murphree's Valley, Ala 

Dorsett, Robert A Murphree's Valley, Ala 



STUDENTS. 69 

Eckles, Mae E Tupelo, Miss 

Eckles/ Bernice L 

Everett, Julia h Athens, Tenti 

Fuller, Fannie Knoxville, " 

Galloway, William D. Glenville, N. C 

Glaze, Lurah J Mouse Creek, Tenn 

Hendricks, Mae Athens, " 

Herbert, Susie M Chattancog-a, " 

Hicks, Octavia Rural Retreat, Va 

Hill, Janey P Pelham, S. C 

Holland, Belle Chattanoog-a, Tenn 

Holland, Robert T Scottsville, Ky 

Hodge, Mattie , Chattanoog-a, Tenn 

Horn, Edward C Lilly Chapel, Ohio 

Hunnicutt, Mattie Heflin, Ala 

Hutsell, Keturah Athens, Tenn 

Jones, Andrew J Massey, Ala 

Kell, Riley A Cedar Grove, Ga 

lyindley, Julia Glen Ing-lis, N, C 

L/Owe, J. Grant Pin Hook, 7^enn 

Lowery, Andrew J Fort Payne, Ala 

Markin, Ethel E Williamsburg-, Ky 

Miller, Grace Athens, Tenn 

Miller, S. Ernest Johnson City, " ^ 

McGrew, Mag-g-ie , Long-'s Mills, " 

Morris, Ada Heflin, Ala 

Myers, Rosa B Annex, Va 

Newton, William H Kinsey, Ala 

Nicholsoh, Lizzie Chattanoog-a, Tenn 

Nicholson, Nola Patty, " 

Patterson, Helen R Vineland, " 

Pierce, Nelson A Elg-in, 111 

Prentiss, Ruth E Chattanoog-a, Tenn 



70 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Pope, James G Sparta, Tenn 

Radebaugh, William Danville, 111 

Reynolds, Grace M Ashville, N. C 

Russell, Ida M Morristown, Tenn 

Russell, Allie " " 

Scates, Walker J Ebenezer, " 

Shipley, Bertie K Athens, " 

Snyder, Charles M Stribbling- Spring-s, Va 

Smith, Lora Pin Hook, Tenn 

Scott, Mag-g-ie Athens, " 

Stanley, Lena Mortimer, " 

Sutton, Paralee Culberson, N. C 

Smalling, David R Wataug-a, Tenn 

Taylor, Addie E Chattanoog-a, " 

Umensetter, Madg-e Lookout Mountain, " 

Umensetter, Mabel " " " 

Umensetter, Edith " " 

Verity, Mabel Harriman, " 

Williams, W. D. C .Athens, " 

Warner, Melle W Knoxville, ' ' 

West, Victor R Athens, " 

Zeller, Julius C Spring- Bay, 111 

COMMERCIAL DI^PARTMENT. 

Alexander, Mary E Griffitts, Tenn 

Adams, Lula Chattanoog-a, " 

Bailey, Belle Baileyton, " 

Baker, John C. C Dare, ' ' 

Barnard, Charles J Celeste, Texas 

Bess, Wilbur C Patt's Creek, Va 

Black, J. Virg-il Athens, Tenn 

Black, Minnie " " 



STUDENTS. 71 

Bolton, Ira M Athens, Tenn 

Bruner, Arthur Georg-iana, Fla 

Comer, James E. . Jacksboro, Tenn 

Duckworth, Henry M Athens, " 

Easterly, Hubert T Little Chucky, " 

Erwin, D. M Big- Spring-, " 

Fryar, J. W Athens, " 

Gass, Leander E. Cleveland, " 

Galloway, William D Athens, " 

Gallaher, William M Moon, " 

Glaze, H. M Sweetwater, " 

Gobbell, Isaac H Waynesboro, Tenn 

Gorman, Estella Grand View, " 

Hennessee, Emanuel A Morg-anton, N. C 

Harris, J. Berch Corryton, " 

Henderson, Lute Athens, Tenn 

Hill. Jackson J Resaca, Ga 

Holling-sworth, William H Jacksboro, Tenn 

Humphrey, Albert S Blue Spring-, " 

Humphris, Claude B Rich Patch, Va 

Hyatt, Eddie D Whitesburg-, Tenn 

Isenberg-, Fannie Knoxville, 

Jackson, John A Pin Hook, 

Jackson, Sam. H " 

Julian, Urbie Chatata, 

Kelley, Lucy Athens, 

Kelley, Eddie 

Knig-ht, Ralph 

Long, Wilbur R " 

Lowe, John W " 

Markin, Ethel E Williamsburg, Ky 

Morris, Ada Heflin, Ala 

Morris, Nora Bowdon, Ga 



72 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Morg-an, Calvin W Cedar Grove, Ga 

McChristian, Geo W Sweetwater, Tenn 

Newcombe, R. Burgoyne Manistee, Mich 

Prentiss, Ruth E Chattanoog-a, Tenn 

Rog-ers, Jesse L Old Town, " 

Roberts, Fred W Ashville, N. C 

Ryan, Thomas A Grove Oak, Ala 

Ryan, James L " " " 

Ray, James A Story, ' ' 

Smalling, David R Wataug-a, Tenn 

Smith, Nannie .Atlanta, Ga 

Scates, Walker J Ebenezer, Tenn 

Snyder, Charles M Stribbling- Spring-s, Va 

Taylor, Addie .Chattanooga, Tenn 

Trusty, Grant G Providence, " 

Verity, Mabel E Harriman, " 

Wallin, Robert D Cedar Grove, Ga 

Warner, Hope K Knoxville, Tenn 

West, Victor R Athens, " 

Wilhite, David C Amanda, " 

Williams, W. D. C Athens, " 

Wright, Ernest A 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

Abrames, Ada Knoxville, Tenn 

Adams, Lulu Chattanooga, " 

Banks, Cora " " 

Bledsoe, Emma Turtle Town, " 

Burson, Nora Birmingham, Ala 

Casey, Annie Athens, Tenn 

Casey, Bertie " " 



STUDENTS. 73 

Chase, Emma Athens, Tenn 

Dail, Lizzie Clinton, " 

Dorsett, Fannie Murphree's Valley, Ala 

Eckles, Mae E Tupelo, Miss 

Eckles, Bernice L " 

Fuller, Fannie Knoxville, Tenn 

Gilbert, Abigail Lewisville, Ind 

Gorman, Estella Grand View, Tenn 

Hartslield^ Ola .• . . Rosewood, Ala 

Hicks, Octavia ' Rural Retreat, Va 

Hill, Janey P Pelham, S. C 

Herbert. Susie M Chattanooga, Tenn 

Hodge, Mattie " 

Holland, Belle 

Hunnicutt, Mary I Heilin, Ala 

Hunnicutt, Mattie " " 

Hyatt, Eddie D Whitesburg, Tenn 

Lindley, Julia Glen Inglis, N. C 

Mangleburg, Christina Pelham, S. C 

Markin, Ethel E Williamsburg, Ky 

McGrew, Maggie Long's Mills, Tenn 

McSwain, Helen Edwardsville, Ala 

Morris, Ada Heflin, " 

Morris, Nora L Bowdon, Ga 

Myers, Rosa B Annex, Va 

Nicholson, Lizzie Chattanooga, Tenn 

Nicholson, Nola. . . ^ Patty, " 

Prentiss, Ruth E Chattanooga, " 

Reynolds, Grace M Ashville, N. C 

Russell, Ida M Morristown, Tenn 

Russell, Allie " 

Scott, Maggie Athens, " 

Smith, Nannie Heflin, Ala 



;74 U. S*. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

-Smith, Lora Pin Hjok, Tetin 

Stanley, Lena Mortimer, " 

Sutton, Paralee Culberson, N. C 

Taylor, Addie E Chattanoog-a, Tenn 

Umensetter, Mabel Lookout Mountain, 

Umensetter, Madge " " 

Umensetter, Edith 

Verity, Mabel E. W Harriman, 

Waddell, Nannie E Henshaw, 

Warner, Melle W . . . Knoxville, 

Zieg"ler, Ida Rock Creek, 

NOTE— In enumerating- the students in the CoUeg-e of Liberal Arts 
on pages 57 and 58, the small figures desig-nate the course being- pursued 
as follows: 1— Classidal; 2— Philosophical; 3 — Scientific. 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 

Post Graduate 3 

CoUeg-e of Liberal Arts 30 

Colleg"e Preparatory ' 206 

Special 58 

Music .... 15 

Art 8 

Elocution 74 

Business ' 63 

Industrial 51 

508 
Deduct, counted more than once 199 

'Total at Athens 309 



AT CHATTANOOGA. 



THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Francisco, Geo. T Rog-ersville 

Johnson, Thomas J Bellaire, Ohio 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

Beaman Abraham S i . . . . Alco, N. C 

Baldwin, Nicholson M Jonesboro 

Lynch, Charles New Decatur, Ala 

Morg-an, Georg-e W Morgan Springs 

Morse, George E Smithville, Canada 

Smith, Henry L . Marcus, Iowa 

Wolford, Charles E Bolington, Va 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Braswell, Lewis J Birmingham, Ala 

Barnes, Henry P Morris Chapel 

Davis, Charles S Beaufort, N. C 

Gunn, Lewis G Chattanooga 

Hinton, Wm. H Moon 

Jones, Samuel G Oneonta, Ala 

Martin, Bert M .Haysville, N. C 

Paschal, U. Grant ' . . . . Shelbyville 

Stephens, M. Hale Morristown 

Weston, William P Bartonville, Ala 

Wolfe, Joseph M Cohutta, Ga 

[75] 



76 u. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

PREPARATORY. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Avis, Carroll Athens 

Burris, Minnie Chattanoog-a 

Few, Nellie 

Miller, Gertrude " 

McCaleb, Florence Morristown 

McDermott, Herbert Chattanoog-a 

Manker, Paul Sherman Heig-hts 

Stewart, William Jasper 

Wolfe, J. M Whitfield, Ga 

SECOND YEAR. 

Burris, Louisa Chattanooga 

Benton, Castilla Cleveland, O 

Bates, Nora Chattanooga 

Colville, Fred Hill City 

Cate, Ethel Chattanooga 

Collins, Florence Rheatown 

Dyer, George Birmingham, Ala 

Hampton, Annie Hill City 

Hooper, Frank Chattanooga 

Mack, George " 

Paschal, U. G Shelbyville 

Rogers, Lizzie Sherman Heights 

Weiser, Eileen Chattanooga 

White, Geneva Ridgedale 

White, Charles 

FIRST YEAR. 

Breeding, Samuel Chattanooga 



STUDENTS. 77 

Cope, Carroll Hill City 

Colville, Young- Chattanoog-a 

Gunn, Lewis " 

Horton, Ralph 

Hulse, Alexander * ' 

Kinsey, John S Harg-rave, Ga 

Lewis, Milton Sherman Heig-hts 

McCallie, James P Suburba 

Merrill,- Grace. Chattanooga 

North, Clark Johnsonburg-, N. Y 

Padgett, Dexter Ooltewah 

Prentiss, Park Chattanooga 

Prentiss, Ruth 

Roszelle, Stephen Ridgedale 

Sanders, John Chattanoog-a 

Shepherd, Pope " 

Schoulder, Ralph Sherman Heights 

Smith, Shelby Tunnel Hill, Ga 

Stroud, Charles Acworth, Ga 

Wight, Walter Chattanooga 

SPECIAL. 

Dayton, W. E Chattanooga 

Ellis, John " 

Hostetler, Linn B " 

Hunter, Fanny Sherman Heig-hts 

Johnson, Horace Chattanoog-a 

Steele, Frank " 

Weiser, Daniel " 

Monroe, H. T Nicholson, Miss 



78 U.S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

NORMAL COURSE. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Hampton, Walter Hill City 

McCaleb, Julia Morristown 

Sells, Lucy Bridg-eport, Ala 

SECOND YEAR. 

Crofts, Samuel Big- Lick 

Galbraith, Jennie Albany, Oreg"on 

Lowe, Lettie Suburba 

McFarland, Gail .Urbana, Ohio 

Paschal, Annie Shelbyville 

Phillips, Irman '. Chattanooga 

Roll, Edna Hill City 

Sells, Jacob . . .Bridg^eport, Ala 

Thompson, Fred Hill City 

White, Margaret St. Elmo 

FIRST YEAR. 

Braswell, Nellie Grove Oak, Ala 

Brock, David Lorraine 

Bruner, Arthur Augusta, 111 

Bennett, Mae Chattanoogfa 

Clark, Leonora " 

Cook, Earl 

Cope, May " 

Crofts, Charles Big- Lick 

Fowler, Georg-e Clarkson, Miss 

Hall, Jessie Chattanooga 

Hobart, William " 

Howk, William 



STUDENTS. 79 

Hunter, Cora ..... Shermn Heig-hts. 

Jenkins, Thomas Deptford, Ala 

Jenkins, Mary " " 

Johnson, William Chattanoog-a 

Lewis, Alpha " 

Lewis. Arthur .... " 

Lowe, Lettie Suburba 

Mack, Kate Chattanoog-a. 

McClorg-, Lillie King-'s Point 

Richardson, Lettie. Chattanooga 

Stewart, Bessie " 

Smith, Mabel New Decatur, Ala 

Tower, George Chattanooga 

Woods, John . .Sherman Heights^ 

Yarnell, Oscar . Hill City 

pre;paratoey. 

Breeding, Joseph Chattanooga 

Brown, Jessie " 

Burr, Lewis " 

Catlin, Harry East End 

Clark, Frank Chattanooga 

Clark, Elburta 

Campbell, Gordon ■ • ■ . " , 

Crawford, Walter " 

DeBardelaben, Henry " 

Farquhar, Harry " 

Hulse, Catherine " 

Hooker, Charles East End 

Letner, William Chattanoog-a 

McCaleb, Morah .Morristown 

McClorg-, Bettie King-'s Point 

Powell, Bama Fredricksburg-, Va 



\ 

80 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

Shepherd, Lewis Chattanoog-a 

'*Smith, James Hill City 

Underbill, Eddie Chattanoog-a 

Ward, Lewis Suburba 

Weller, Mamie Chattanooga 

* Williams, William Rough Creek, Va 

* Deceased. 



MUSIC. 



Smith, Mabel 
Bennett, Mae 
North, Clark. 



ELOCUTION. 

Tew, Nellie Chattanooga 

Friedman, Rosa 

Hurst, Mamie " 

Johnson, T. J 

McCaleb, Florence Morristown 

Morse, G. E 

Parker, Lena Bank Head, Ala 

Smith, Mabel, .... New Decatur, Ala 

Sells, Lucy Bridgeport, Ala 

Stitch, May 

Wesson, Belle Chattanooga 

Wesson, Gertrude " 

Weeks, Clara " 

"Wolford, C. E 



STUDENTS. 81 

SUMMARY. 

Colleg-e Preparatory 53 

Normal 62 

Music 3 

Elocution 14 

Theolog-ical . . ' 20 

Medical 120 

272 

Deduct names counted twice .... 4 

Total at Chattanoosra 268 



GRAND SUMMARY. 

At Athens . . 309 

At Chattanoog-a 268 

Grand Total 577 



CHARTER. 

_j^E IT KNOWN, that Isaac W. Joyce, John M. Walden, Joseph C. Hartzell. 
la D. M. Key, Halbert B. Case, Earl Cranston, J. H. Bayliss, M. D. Cone, 
A. J. Gahagan, T. C. Carter, J. K. P. Marshall, E. H. Matthews, John 
F. Spence, J. D. Walsh, Amos Shinkle, L. B. Caldwell and J. W. Adams are 
hereby constituted a body politic and corporate by the name and style of 
"U. S. Grant University,"* for the lollowing purposes, namely: The main- 
tenance of a university of Christian learning under the patronage, control 
and regulation of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as represented in the 
General Conference of said Church, with various colleges, academies, nor- 
mal and preparatory schools, societies, lyceums, libraries, and schools of 
art, law, and medicine, normal, training, trade, and such other schools as 
may from time to time be organized by the Board of Trustees; with power 
to confer degrees; with authority to create Boards of Visitors, prescribe the 
mode of election and define their duties; such board or boards to be sepa" 
rate from, and in addition to, the BoSrd of Trustees. 

2. The property owned, or to be owned, or held by the corporati m 
hereby created shall be so held and owned in the name of said corporation 
for the use and benefit of the Methodist Episcopal Church, under such 
trust clause, or clauses, as may be provided in the book of Discipline of 
said Church. And the goverment and management of said corporation, 
and the teachings in its several schools, shall forever be condircted in har- 
mony and consonance with, and in the interest of, the said Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, as set forth, or declared from time to time, by the General 
Conference of said Church. 

3. Said corporation shall be self-perpetuating, subject only to the pr.li- 
cy above stated. Any departure from the objects and policy of said ci^r 
poration as above limited shall be good ground for remoy.-il of the Board o^ 
Trustees upon cause properly shown in the court of equity having jurisdic. 
tion, but shall not work a forfeiture of this charter 

4. The general powers of said corporation shall be to sue and be sued 
- by the corporate name ; to have and use a common seal, which it may al 

ter at pleasure ; if no common seal, then the signature of the name of the 
corporation by any duly authorized officer shall be legal and binding ; to 
purchase and hold, or receive by gift, bequest, or devise, in addition to the 
personal property owned by the corporation, real estate necessary for tlie 
transaction of the corporate business, and also such property, real and per- 
sonal, or special trusts, as may be deemed needful for special purposes ; 



egally changed from Grant Memorial University June 7, 1S92. 
[82] 



CHARTEF. 83 

and also to purchase and accept any real estate in payment, or in part pay- 
ment, of any debt due to the incorporation, and sell the same; to establish 
By-laws, and make all rules and regulations, not inconsistent with the laws 
and constitution, deemed expedient for the management of corporate af- 
fairs; and to appoint such subordinate officers and agents, in addition to 
the president, secretary and treasurer, as the business of the corporation 
may require, designate the name of the office, and fix the compensation of 
the officer; elect such teachers, professors, and faculties of the various 
schools of the univerity as they shall deem best and fix the salaries of the 
same. The School of Theology, the School of Law, the School of Medi- 
cine and the School of Technology -shall be located at Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee. The College of Liberal Arts shall be located at Athens, Tennes- 
see; with aca,demic departments of equal grade at each place, and such 
other departments at either place as may hereafter be determined upon by 
the Board of Trustees * 

5. Jhe said corporation shall within a convenient time after the regis- 
tation of this charter in the office of the Secretary of State, elect from their 
number a president, secretary and treasurer, or the last two officers may 
be combined into one; said officers and the other incorporators to constitute 
the first Board of Trustees. In all elections each member present shall be 
entitled to one vote, and the result shall be determined by a majority of 
the vote cast. Due notice of any election must be given by advertisement 
in a newspaper, personal notice to the members, or a day stated on the min- 
utes of the board six months preceding the election. The Board of Tru - 
tees shall keep a record of all their proceedings, which shall be at all times 
subject to the inspection of any member. The corporation may establish 
branches or affiliated schools in any other county in the State. 

6. This corporation shall have powpr to increase the number of trus- 
tees; to regulate the mode and manner of appointments of the same on ex- 
piration of terms of service; to remove any trustee from the said corpora- 
tion when in their judgment he shall be rendered incapable, by age or oth- 
erwise, of discharging the duties of his office, or shall neglect or refuse to 
perform the same; to regulate the number, duties, and manner of election 
of officers, either actual or ex officio: to appoint executive agencies, and to 
pass all other by-laws for the government of said institution, as may be re- 
quired by the Methodist Eniscopal Church : Provided, said by-laws are not 
inconsistent with the constitution and laws of this State. At least two- 
thirds of the trustees shall be members in good standing of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. The terms of all officers may be fixed by the by-laws; 
the said term not, however, to exceed three years. All officers and trustees 
shall hold over until their successors are elected and qualified. 

7. The members may at any time voluntarily dissolve the corpora- 
tion, by the conveyance of its assets and property to any other corporation 
holding a charter from this State not for purposes of individual profit, first 
providing for incorporate debts ; Provided, the objects and aims of said 
corporation shall be the same and in harmony with those contained in this 
charter. A violation of any of the provisions of this charter shall subject 



^Amendment of June 7, 1892 



84 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 



the corporation to dissolution at the instance of the State, in which event 
its property and effects shall revert to the Trustees of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, a corporate body existing under, and by virtue of, the laws of 
the State of Ohio. This charter is subject to modification or amendment 
by the Legislature, and in case said modification or amendment is not ac- 
cepted, corporate business is to cease, and the assets and property, after 
paymient of debts, are to be conveyed, as aforesaid, to some other corpora- 
tion holding a charter for purposes not connected with individual profit, 
and for the same objects and benefit of, and revert to, the aforesaid Trus- 
tees of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Acquiescence in any modification 
thus declared shall be determined in a meeting of the members specially 
called for that purpose, and only those voting in favor of the modification 
shall thereafter compose the corporation . 

8. The means, assets, income, or other property- of'^the corporation 
snail not be employed, directly or indirectly, for any other purpose what' 
ever than to acomplish the legitimate objects of its creation, and by no im- 
plication or construction shall it possess the power to issue notes or coin, 
buy or sell products, or engage in any kind of trading operation, nor hold- 
ing more real estate than is necessary for its legitimate purposes, and in no 
event shall the trustees permit any part of the principal of the endowment 
fund, or funds, or any portion of the real estate of the corporation, to be 
usjd for the payment of the current expenses. 

9. We, the undersigned, hereby apply to the State of Tennnessee, by 
virtue of the laws of the land, for a charter of incorporation for the purpose 
and with the powers and privileges, etc., declared in the foregoing instru- 
ment. Witness our hands the 26th day of March, A. D., 1S8',I. 

Isaac. W Joyce, T. C. Carter, 

D. M. Key, J. W. Adams, 

J. C. HaRTZELL, E. H. M.iTTHEWS, 

J. H. B.4YLISS, J. D. Walsh, 

M. D. Cone, John F. Spexce, 

A. J. Gah.\gan, L,. B. Caldwell, 

Earl Cranston, J. M. Walden, 

J. K. P. Marshall, A. Shinkle, 

Halbkrt B. C.\se. 

I, CHARLES A. MILLER, Secretary of ,the State of Tennesse, do certify 
;he foregoing instrument, witli certificates of acknowledgement of probate 
a id registration, was filed in my office for registration on the 27th day of 
April, 1889, and recorded on the 27th day of April, 1889, in Corporation 
R 'Cord Book ''O," in said office, page 118 et seq 

In testimony wliereof. I have hereto* subscribed my official signature' 
and, by order of the governor, affixed the great seal of the State of 
Tennessee, at the department, in the City of Nashville, this 27th 
day of Aprjl, A. ]>.. 1889. 

C. A. MiLLKR, Secretary of State. 



BY=LAWS 

OF" 



U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 



SECTION I. 
Meetings of the Board. 

1[1. Thi.' annual meeting of the Board of Trustees sLiall be held iu Athens 
and in Chattanooga on each alternate year" on the day immediately pro- 
ceding Commencement in each place, at nine (9) o'clock in the forenoon, 
unless oiherwise determined, and eleven of the members shall constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business, but a less number may adjourn 
from time to time and from one place to the other 

1[ 2. On the written request of seven members of the Board, stating the 
object they have in view, the President shall call a special meeting. In 
case of his death or inability, the Secretary shall issue the call. 

^ 3. Special meetings shall be called by a notice addressed to each 
member at least ten days before the time of such meeting, specifying the 
object or objects for which the. meeting is called. The Board shall be re- 
stricted to the rransaction ol business named in the call. A notice of special 
meetings shall be sent to the Methodist papers within the bounds of the 
patronizing conferences. 

H 4. It shall be the duty of each member to attend, when practicable, 
the meelinis of the Board, and to use his btst endeavors to i>romote the 
interests of the University. 

« SECTION II. 

Officers A>r> Committees. 

H 1. The regular oflHcers of the Board shall be elected by ballot at each 
annual meeting, and shall be a President, two Vice-Presidents, Secretary, 
Treasurer, and Assistant Treasurer; and an Execusive Committee, which 
shall consist of the President of this Board of Trustees, the Chancellor of 
the University, four members of this Board residing at Chattanooga and 
four residing at Athens. The Dean of the School of Liberal Arts at Chat- 
tanooga, and the Dean of the Faculty at Athens, shall be advisory member^ 
of the Executive Committee. 



■'Amendment of^May 23. ]S9:\ 

[85] 



86 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

f 3. There shall also be appointed at each annual meeting a Commit- 
tee on Libraries, Apparatus, and Museums, and a Committee on Finance, 
each to consist of the Chancellor and two members of the Board at Athens 
and two at Chattanooga; also a Committee on Faculty, composed of seven 
members of this Board, including the Chancellor. 

If 3. There shall be a Local Committee at Chattanooga, and one at Ath- 
ens, composed respectively of the resident members of the Board at each 
place; the Chancellor shall be Chairman, and the President of this Board a 
member ex officio of each local committee. 

If 4. Each of the foregoing standing committees is authorized to flU, 
by the selection of any member of the Board, any vacancy that may occur 
diiring the year. 

SECTION III. 
Povi^ERs AND Duties of the Boakd. 

Tf 1. The Board of Trustees shell enact By-Laws, Rules, and Regulations 
and shall elect the Chancellor and other members of the Faculty, and other 
officers of the Univerity, and may remove them, or either of them from 
office, if after due investigation it shall appear that there is cause sufficient 
to justify their removal : Provided, neither the Chancellor nor other 
members of the Faculty shall be removed except by a two-thirds vote of the 
members present. 

% 2. The Board of Trustees shall determine the salaries of all the mem- 
bers of the Faculty, and of all other officers employed or appointed by the 
Board; shall authorize and direct the expenditure of all the revenue derived 
from tuition, and from incidental charges, and from all sums paid directly 
by the students; and also of all gifts bestowed for the purpose of improving 
the grounds or"buildings, for the increase of the library, the apparatus or 
other facilities of instruction; and shaU prescribe the courses of study; 
and shall direct and act in all matters that relate to the proper government, 
discipline, and instruction of the students. 

If 3. The Board of Trustees shall see that all the funds of the University 
are securely invested or reinvested, and that all trusts are faithfully admin- 
istered, and it shall manage all of the affairs of the corporation, and exe- 
cute all of the powers and privileges conferred by the Charter. 

If 4. After the selection of the Board of Visitors, as contemplated by 
Section X of the By-laws, the members of such Board shall be entitled to 
participate in the annual meetings of said Board of Trustees, but shall 
not vote. The Board may order an executive .session at any time during 
the annual meeting. 

SECTION IV. 

Treasurer and Assistant. 

If 1. The Treasurer shall hold and keep such funds belonging to the 
University as may be left with him by the Board of Tru.stees or the Execu- 
tive Committee, or as may be paid or donated to the University, and dis- 
burse the same under the direction of the Board of Trustees or the Execu' 



BY-LAWS. 87 

tive Committee. He shall give bond for the faithful discharge of his duties 
in such amounts as shall be required by the Board of Trustees. 

If 2. The Assistant Treasurer shall, under the direction of the Board of 
Trustees or the Executive Committee, assist the Treasurer in the duties of 
his office. 

/ SECTION V. 

The Executive Committee. , 

T[ 1. The Executive Committee shall meet at least once at Athens and 
•once at Chattanooga during each school year, and the Chairman is author- 
ized to call special meetings at either place whenever, in his judgment, 
the interest of the University require it. Special meetings may also be 
called by a majority of the Committee. 

% 2. The Executive Committee shall transact the business specially 
•committed to it, and take general charge of the interests of the Uuiversity 
in the intervals between the meetings of the Board of Trustees; provide, 
till the next meeting of the Board of Trustees, for any vacancy which may 
occur in the Faculty; and make a full report of all its transactions to the 
Board of Trustees. 

1[ 3. The Executive Committee shall have power to expend all funds 
necessary to discharge all obligations imposed upon it by these rules, and 
bevween the meetings of the Board, to give direction as to the expenditure 
of funds by local committees, and report the same to the Board. It shall 
require the concurrence of five members of the Executive Committee to ex- 
pend funds or order their expenditure. 

H 4. The Executive Committee shall have the custody of all deeds and 
other evidences of titles to property belonging to the University; and be- 
tween the meetings of the Board, it shall give direction to the investment 
of all funds, and the reinvestment of the same for the benefit of the institu- 
tion. Eight members shall be required for a quorum in all such transac- 
tions; in all other eases six members shall constitute a quorum. 

SECTION VI. 
Committee on Library, Apparatus and Museum. 

H 1. The Committe on Library, Apparatus and Museum shall take the 
general oversight of these interests in the University, and present the re- 
quired reports to the annual meeting of the Board. 

1[ 2. This Committee shall make rules relative to the use and preserva- 
tion of the libraries, and report their condition to the Board of Trustees; it ' 
shall have power to direct the expenditures of all the revenues of the Li- 
brary, and all funds given or set apart for its increase or preservation. 

^ 3. It shall see that the apparatus belonging to the University is kept 
In good order, without nesessary loss or damage; cause a catalogue to be 
prepared of the names and value of all articles of apparatus, and report the 
condition and value of the same to the Board. Said Committee shall have 
power to expend all the funds set apart or given for the increase or preser- 
vation of the apparatus. 



88 U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

If 4. It shall annually devise and report to the Board of Trustees plans 
ior securing articles or material for the museums, cause a catalogue to be 
kept of all articles therein, and have general supervision of the collection 
of the same, and the distribution of the moneys appropriated therefor. 

SECTION VII. 

FiN.'vxcE Committee. 

Tf 1. The Finance Committt r shall annually audit the acceounts of the 
University, and make careful ;md detailed report to this Board of al 
money, property and chattels received or possessed by the University; also 
of the expenditures, and for what expended. They shall inspect all .secu- 
rities taken or received by the Executive Committee, aud report the same 
to the Board. They shall perform such other duties as may from time to 
time be required of tl em by the Board. 

SECTION VIII. 

Committee on Faculty. 

If 1. The Committee on Faculty shall be composed of seven members 
of this Board, including the Chancellor. Its duties shall be to nominate 
to the annual meeting a Chancellor and other members of the Faculty, to 
siibmit a report as to the general work of the Faculty, and make any rec- 
ommendations it may deem necessary as to changes in ^the provisions for 
instruction. 

SECTION IX. 
Local Committees. 

If 1. The Local Committees at Chattanooga and at Athens shall act un- 
der the general direction of this Board or its Executive Committee, aud 
shall have at their respective places the immediate supervision of the 
property of the University; shall exercise due vigilance to prevent loss or 
damage to the same; .shall make all necessary arrangements for the exer- 
cises of public days, and for the convenience of the Board at its meetings, 

If 2 They shall take general oversight of the buidings and grovinds be- 
longing to the University at their respective places; see that they are kept 
in good order; make all necessary repairs that are ordered or may be found 
necessary, but shall have power to expend only the funds appropriated for 
these several purposes. 

SECTION X. 

Board of Visitors. 

Each of the following annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcoiwil 
Church — to-wit : Kentucky, Blue Ridge, Holston, Georgia, Alabama, aud 
Central Tennessee— shall be at liberty to elect three persons each at the 
next Annual Conference session to become members of the Board of Visi- 



BY-LAWS. ' 89 

tors, such persons to be elected respectively for one, two, and-three years; 
and after the first election they shall elect one person for such position 
each year, to serve for the period of three years. Ihe members of such 
Board of Visitors shall have the right to participate in the proceedings of 
the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, but nut to vote. 



SECTION XI. 
The Faculty. 

Tf.l. The Faculty of the University shall consist of the Chancellor of the 
University, a President'" of the University, the Dean of the several depart 
ments, the Professor and the Tutors. 

IT 2. The Chancellor shall- be elected annually by ballot by the Board 
of Trustees at the annual meeting, or at a special meeting called for that 
purpose. 

^ 3. All members of the Faculty shall be elected by the Board of Trus- 
tees on nomination by the Committee on Faculty, except as otherwise or- 
dered. 



SECTION XII. 
Government, Course of Study, Etc. 

% 1. The Government of the University shall be vested iu the Chan- 
cellor and other members of the Faculty. For the more convenient admin 
istration of the University the government of the departments at Athens 
shall be conducted by the Chancellor and the members of the Faculty at 
Athens; and of the department at Chattanooga, by the Chancellor and 
the members of the Faculty at Chattanooga. 

H ■-'. It shall be the duty of each and every member of the Faculty to 
co-operate with the Chancellor in this government, and to use special care 
tc secure the observance of the rules of order in the University adopted by 
thn Faculty, with the approval of the Executive Committee. 

Tf 3. The Faculties with the concurrence of the Chancellor, shall have 
power to determine, subject to the revision of the Board, the courses of 
study; they shall also in like manner determine the arrangement of the 
studies, lectures, and other exercises, the times and modes of recreaticn» 
and the general method of instruction. 

f 4. At each annual meeting the Chancellor of the University shall 
report to this Board the state of the University, and offer any suggestions 
and propose any measure, which in his judgment would tend to increase 
the resourses, extend the influence, and better adapt the University to the 
state of science and the wants of society. 



"•Amendment of June 7, 1892. 
There is now pending an amendment to the By-Laws— passed on first 
reading. May 23, 1803: 1. To abolish the office of President of the Universty.. 
2. To create the oiBce of Vice-< hancellor. These amendments will come- 
up for final passage at the annual meeting of 1894. 



"^0 " U. S. GRANT UNIVERSITY. 

SECTION XIII, 
Degrees 

If 1. The Chancellor shall have the power to confer degrees on such 
persons as shall be recommended by a majority vote of the Faculty, and 
-approval by vote of this Board. 

1[ 3. The degree of Bachelor of Science may be conferred on students 
recommended by the faculty as having completed the Scientific Course, and 
as having complied with the established requirements. 

1[ 4. The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy may be conferred on stu- 
dents recommended by the Faculty as having completed the Philosophic 
Course, and as having complied with the established requirements. 

K 5. The degreee of Bachelor of Arts may be conferred on students rec- 
■ommended by the Faculty as having completed the regular Classical 
Course, and as having complied with all other prescribed conditions. 

% 5. The degree of Master of Arts may be conferred on Bachelors of 
Arts of three years' standing, who are duly recommended by the Faculty. 

H 7. Such other degrees as are usnally conferred by institutions of this 
grade may be conferred by this Board of Trustees on;; the recommendation 
of the Faculty. 

f 8. Honorary degrees may be conferred on those recommended by 

" th-e Faculty as well worthy the honor; but all recommendations for such 

■degrees must be presented to the Faculty at least thirty days before the 

meeting of the Board of Trustees, and the Faculty shall not be at liberty to 

recommend more than three persons for any one honorary degree. 

SECTION XIV. 

Order of Business. 

K 1. At the appointed hour of the annual meeting the Board shall be 
•called to order by the President, or Vice-President, or in their absence, by 
the Secretary. In the absence of the President and both Vice-Presidents, a 
President pro tempore shall be appointed. The meeting shall then be 
opened with prayer, after which the order of business shall be as follows: 

1. Roll-call. 

2. The reading of the minutes of the previous meeting for information. 

3. Report of the Chancellor of the University, and communications 
from the Faculty, to be presented by him. 

4. The appointment of such special committees as may be ordered 
with reference to the business of the meeting. 

^5. Election of Trustees. 

6. Report of the Treasurer. 

7. Report of the Executive Committee 

8. Report of the Local Committees. 

9. Report of the Committee on Library, Apparatus and Museum. 

10. Report of the Finance Committee. 

11. Report of the Committee on Faculty. 

12. Report of Special Committees. 

13. The election of the officers of the Board. 



BY-I.AWS. ' , 91 

14. Election of Executive Corainittee and other committees. 

15. Unfinished business laid over from a previous meeeting. 

16. Election of the Chancellor and other members of the Faculties. 

17. Miscellaneous business. 

Tf 2. A majority of the members present may change the order of busi- 
ness, and give precedence to any item they may select. 

f 3. Before the final adjournment of any meeting of the Board, the 
minutes shall be read, and when approved, shall be signed by the President 
and Secretary. 

SECTION XV. 

Rules of Order. 

If 1. The rules of parliamentary proceedings, as generally understood, 
shall govern the Board in all cases to which they are applicable, and in 
which they are not inconsistent with its special rules and orders. 

SECTION XVI. 
Amendments. 

If 1. These By-Laws, Rules and Regulations may be amended at any 
annua! meeeting by a vote of two-thirds of the members present; but notice 
of proposed amendments shall be given to the members two months at 
least before action shall be taken. 

If 2. A majority of three-fourths of those present at any regular meet' 
lug may suspend any rules during the continuance of that meeting. 



EDGAR CHILDRESS, 

Book Store, 

Opposite First National Bank, 

THEIR BOOK STORE ever since ITS establish- 
ment has been STUDENT'S HEADQUARTERS. The 
stock of BO KS, STATIONERY and NEWS will be 
about double this summer. It is here that the TEXT 
BOOKS used in Grant University will be sold. There 
>/vill be no delays in getting Books, as they will be in stock 
before school opens. AH goods will be bought DIRECT 
FROM MANUFACTURERS and PUBLISH ERS, so the 
PRICES will be as LOW as in the large cities. The 
motto of this store is : Always Something Fresh and 
New. 

AGEHTS FOK THE BEST LAUNDRY IN THE SODTH. 



T. H. PAYNE & CO,, 

Jobbers and Retailers 

Book|iStatiooe[f|iWalliPappe[| 



Fine Stationeru in Latest Stules, 
Engraved Visiting Cards, 
Wedding Stationeru. 

Market and Broad Sts.. GHflTTflNOOOfl, TENN. 






glllQPgOI] BROS, 

Headquarters for Latest Styles 

Gent's --FurnlslilDg-:- Goods. 



Complete Stock of Clothing, 

Hats, 

Underwear, 

Shoes, 

Slippers, Suitable for all Customers 



TDDENTS' OOTFIT A SPECIALTY 



The long Standing and Reliability of Our 

House has Given us a Reputation which 

we are Jealous to Maintain. 



ORDERS BY MAIL rROMPTLY FILLED, 



Simpson Bros. 

Cor. 9th and Market Sts., 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



D. B. LOVEMAN & CO. 



ONE-PRICE 




esl Grade of Merchdndise al Lowest Pfices, 



Dress Goods, Silks, / 
Underwear, Hosiery, 
Kid Gloves, 
Men's : Furnishing : Goods, 
Fine Dressmaking, 

Millinery and Carpets. 

Goods Sent by IVlail or Express to all parts of 
the Country. 

D. B, LOVEfflAN & CO. 

CHATTANOOGA, - TENN. 



u- 



} 



COOKE LIBRARY 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



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